429nufc

Member
Turkish - the language experience
My pal in the village moved from Istanbul 15 years ago and he is refered to as Yabanci
 

gam101

Member
Turkish - the language experience
No derogatory connotation with the term 'yabanci'...
But there are unfavourable perceptions associated with being a foreigner... (generally 'stupid'..) iptal yabanci...stupid foreigner

Vodafone practces that really insulting pricing policy to 'price gouge' foreigners'' despicable epecially considring its strong UK origins...

Appreciate the follow-up.

I'm thinking though that the Vodafone guy may have taken me for a ride :(....because he showed the "Vodafone Yabancilar" contract, but made me also sign a different (a red Vodafone) contract...... It is this red contract he took with him, and allowed me to keep the "Yabancilar" contract.

He showed several of those red forms that customers in the our apartment building had signed up with him. So I believed he was legit. :eek:hwell:

I paid him the 750TL in advance for the 6 months internet (which he showed me was required per the "Yabancilar" contract), and then he said the 400TL modem fee & the 300TL installation fee is due when I get the modem. So, he left saying he will return the next day with the modem.

Now, however, I am thinking that the fact he said he will take the 750TL to Vodafone & get the modem is shady because he could have brought the modem with him....

I'm guessing now he is going to pocket the 400TL modem fee & the 300TL installation fees Vodafone will just get the 750TL.... :18:

Would not be the first time a Yabanci was conned....right? :noidea:

Or maybe I am just overthinking this....:bowl:
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Turkish - the language experience
My pal in the village moved from Istanbul 15 years ago and he is refered to as Yabanci

In some villagers Turks who were not born in the village are called Yabancı, a friend of ours from the other side of the lake has been married to a local woman for 25 years, but they still call him Yabancı in the coffee shop. We are simply referred to as 'Inglizler'
 

enoch

Member
Top Poster Of Month
Turkish - the language experience
In some villagers Turks who were not born in the village are called Yabancı, a friend of ours from the other side of the lake has been married to a local woman for 25 years, but they still call him Yabancı in the coffee shop. We are simply referred to as 'Inglizler'
You are right Abi.
All turkish are classed as a yaban when they move to a different area its not just westerners
 

McB

Member
Turkish - the language experience
Yes but the slight difference between spelling of yabani and yabanci infers an affinity linguistically perhaps obscured by the passage of the ages... when the first travelller were still very primitive... and perhaps a bit wild....

Yabanci is a foreigner... as you say from outside the village or local area... but the stupidity perception applies mainly to non-Turkish yabancilar, and in particular derives historically from British entrepreneurs eagerness to acquire assets in the ottoman empire for commercial investment purposes (for example, Izmir railroad ) during the second half of the 19 th century (1850 onwards..)

...whenever and before handing over cash for commercial purposes ALWAYS ask for a MAKBUZ... an informal MAKBUZ writen on paper or a Tahsilat Makbu typically by form.. either way, it addds another consideration for the receiver of cash to contemplate... otherwise the cash you have given may as well have 'job done-well done' written on it..
 
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WilliamSof

New Member
Turkish - the language experience
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enoch

Member
Top Poster Of Month
Turkish - the language experience
Welcome ,hope you enjoy the forum
 
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Turkish - the language experience
Pronunciation is everything. Learn how to pronounce the letters properly, I also realised var is better understood if I pronounce it with an s on the end. Also, I take photos of unfamiliar signs and translate them and if you can, volunteer somewhere where you deal with Turks, you then learn phrases you need (and pick stuff up off them.) It is hard, and confidence is the main thing, learning is an ongoing process, I've been learning, seriously, for about 6 years (with a fair chunk of lapses) but I'm getting my head around it. Good luck! xx
 

A89

Member
Turkish - the language experience
I walked past a table in a restaurant with some friends, and heard a woman at a table say to her friends 'yabancılar'. I stopped, walked over, paused for effect until I had all their attention, and said in Turkish be careful madam, some yabancı can speak Turkish. Talk about embarrassed, but her friends had a right good laugh.
I did that many times, once in Migros I gave the cashier a 50tl note for shopping almost 30tl and she shouted to the next cashier 'can you break this, the stupid tourist gave it' I quickly pointed out that although I am a foreigner I wasnt a tourist and asked where the manager was, I wish i'd taken a picture of her face. More offensive though is something else that i've heard spoken about me quite a few times - 'salak yabanci oruspu' (stupid foreign slag) about me when alone or when ive been with a friend then it was the plural. The most offensive for me personally though was people slagging me off for wearing a cross & chain. There are definitely some drawbacks to learning Turkish .

alison
 

A89

Member
Turkish - the language experience
Greetings folks!:28:

I'm sharing my experience here with Turkish, hoping that others can chime in & suggest perhaps what worked best for them in learning or "getting upto speed" on the language. We have noticed though that there are more locals speaking English than we encountered last year. But encountering an English speaker is still a rarity.

My hope/intention is not to master Turkish (I seriously doubt I can do that), but rather to understand daily conversations at the bank, the local restaurant in ordering food, at the car mechanic, etc.

I've been using Duolingo for a while & have worked through the first part of it. But, it is getting tough now with the "possessive" tense.

Did anyone here using Duolingo on the phone, or anything similar? Or was it one-on-one lessons with a tutor?

I've also been trying to pickup words from the locals too when I am conversing (Google Translating) with them. For example, "poshet" (bag) at the grocery store, or common words like yarin (tomorrow), sakintay yok (no problem), etc.

What has & has not worked for your guys/gals in learning the language? :hmm:

My busy daily routine (we are still settling in) has prevented me from focusing on Turkish. So, more hours of investment later when the dust has settled, is certain.

But I am concerned about the continued reliance on Google Translate.... :eek:hwell:

Thoughts anyone?

Thank you.

-gam101
Definitely learn how to pronounce each letter correctly. Each letter in Turkish has only one sound, unlike in English where some letters 'E' for example has several different sounds. You wont be understood if you're pronouncing letters with an English accent. One of the best things I did that really helped me progress was going to a free Turkish class to learn grammar. But there I did notice that as soon as we stepped out of the class everyone spoke to waiters etc in English, you need to use every single Turkish word you know at every opportunity. If they reply to you in English, just keep ploughing on in Turkish as far as you can. Occasionally someone would take the piss out of my Turkish (Cabin crew on a Turkish airlines flight for example) so to people that clearly had no English I learnt how to say 'my Turkish isnt good but hows your English' that usually shut them up but to be honest very few people i encountered ever did sneer, most are helpful.
Another tip i'd give you is a tool called WinMakMek (or maybe WinMekMak) you can download it to your device and it gives you every verb and every different Tense/meaning and way of using it.
Good luck!

alison
 

davem

Member
Turkish - the language experience
I also realised var is better understood if I pronounce it with an s on the end.
Thanks very much for this, I have been getting quietly infuriated with the pronunciation of the lady on "Duo Lingo" who does this, and I was on the verge of sending them a blistering complaint!
 

davem

Member
Turkish - the language experience
I always struggled with the pronunciation on Duo Lingo. It's easier tuning into the locals. xx
I've also found that when asking for directions etc., it's sometimes better to ask a child as they will use simpler constructions. Of course, this principle should be used with caution, as multiple attempts to get directions could give adult bystanders totally the wrong impression!
 

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