mollag

Kipper restorer
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
Moolag the Guardian article is behind the times ..and their latest reports reflect a change in how they see things now...
that article was written after he returned from Davos and had shouted SHimon Peres down..the Turks greeted him with enthusiasm because he was macho ..in fact he was being macho and also antisemitic and he was responsible for stirring religious hatred against the Jewish community he accused Peres and İsrael of knowing how well to kill...ignoring the fact that thousands of Kurds could have said the same about his term in office..and some did but were never heard. His behaviour should haunt him as he also said that Muslims dont kill Muslims at the time he was defending the genocide in the Sudan

people have kept this party in power not because of the weakened Military nor because of the headscarf row but because of the economy ...if that worsens as it will..so will the AKPs voters..people follow the money ..voters are fickle if their personal finances suffer.
just a word about the headscarf controversy...the women that shout the loudest to get into university and wear a cloth on their heads are those least likely to use their education afterwards since in general they come from families where women dont work .for role models look at the wives of the party leaders all dolled up and can now attend official do' s..yet none are involved in any worthwhile work and all have degrees...ordinary women have always been free to wear the scarf..although within the constraints of the males in the family..which is food for a different debate


But is he still on your Xmas card list :hmm:
 

eldivenci

Member
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
Well.
I dont know about anyone else, but you have all certainly scared the willies out of me.
:37::37::37:

There is no cause for alarm. The partisan posturing of some personnages merely present the perplexing polarisation and paranoia of party politics in this fair land.
Pen pushers promoting popular prejudice while planning to pervert democratic processes deserve prison as much as other perpetrators.
Perusing the past proves present probes are part of previous practices. The people want progress, not permanent plotting, and possibly progress will come to pass in the future.
 

mollag

Kipper restorer
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
There is no cause for alarm. The partisan posturing of some personnages merely present the perplexing polarisation and paranoia of party politics in this fair land.
Pen pushers promoting popular prejudice while planning to pervert democratic processes deserve prison as much as other perpetrators.
Perusing the past proves present probes are part of previous practices. The people want progress, not permanent plotting, and possibly progress will come to pass in the future.

Well you can P off! :rolleyes:
 

eldivenci

Member
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
I'd prepare for pugilism, but p is for peace, so precipitate action postponed.
 

mollag

Kipper restorer
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
I'd prepare for pugilism, but p is for peace, so precipitate action postponed.

Ere! watch your P's and Q's , this is a quintisentially quiet quango of quiet quality quorum questers -----get in the cue :218by:
 

Sha Hoorsur

Member
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
There is no cause for alarm. The partisan posturing of some personnages merely present the perplexing polarisation and paranoia of party politics in this fair land.
Pen pushers promoting popular prejudice while planning to pervert democratic processes deserve prison as much as other perpetrators.
Perusing the past proves present probes are part of previous practices. The people want progress, not permanent plotting, and possibly progress will come to pass in the future.

Youre taking the "P"
:5:
 
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
Interesting Lez_zetli feel the same way with the most of Turkih people.

Have you ever thought that? Why the so called international community / EU countries, hypocritical friend US does not politic pressure to AKP? Where is the so called democracy lover western states?

Those who said Esad is dictator why they give support to AKP?

NEVER, our people never defect to foreign countries, never cry for help to any country if they need to die, they die in the homeland.

We are not minortiy we are silent majority now and just watching now in due course when we speak AKP, US and EU will be upset.
 

Akasya

Postless Pointer
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
When Assad falls next year AI , you can go to Damascus and tell them of the folly of their ways.

Steve.;
 

skydog

G0B5H1T3
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
Ten years later, Turkey’s Islamist political revolution bearing bitter fruit

By Michael Rubin 11/02/2012

On Nov. 3, 2002, a political revolution swept Turkey. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party, better known by its Turkish acronym AKP, swept to power — winning just 34 percent of the vote but, because of a quirk of Turkish election law, two-third of the seats in parliament. Not only could the AKP rule without coalition partners but, Turkish critics feared, the Islamist party could also use its supermajority to undercut the secular foundations of the Turkish state.

Foggy Bottom assuaged such concern. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher called the AKP’s victory a sign of “the vibrancy of Turkey’s democracy.” Even though Erdoğan had, as Istanbul’s mayor, declared himself the “Imam of Istanbul,” described himself as a “servant of shari’a,” and served time for religious incitement, Daniel Fried, assistant secretary of state, described the AKP as “a kind of Muslim version of a Christian Democratic Party.”

At first, anxiety about the AKP’s religious agenda appeared misplaced. Elected to repair the economy, the party took its task seriously. It stabilized Turkey’s currency, tackled inflation, and catalyzed growth.

Beneath the surface, however, Erdoğan was already working to replace Turkey’s stabilizing secularism with an Islamist social and foreign policy agenda. He replaced all members of Turkey’s powerful banking board with alumni of Islamic finance, most of whom, like current President Abdullah Gül, had cut their teeth in Saudi banks. Once under Islamist control, Erdoğan used the banking board to attack opponents’ assets, confiscating businesses and driving some into bankruptcy. AKP appointees, however, turned a blind eye to the influx of Saudi and Qatari money into AKP coffers and slush-funds.

Other bureaucratic manipulations had even greater reverberations. Tweaking admissions formulas opened universities to religious students long denied acceptance because they lacked a solid liberal arts foundation. In order to help these unqualified graduates then enter the civil service, Erdoğan imposed a new interview process, transforming a meritorious civil service into a mechanism for political patronage.

Not every reform worked. Judges vacated an AKP decision to impose a mandatory retirement age on civil servants. The scheme would have allowed Erdoğan to appoint 4,000 new judges, almost half of Turkey’s total judiciary. In response to judicial vetoes, Bülent Arınç, then speaker of the parliament and now Erdoğan’s chief deputy, threatened to dissolve the constitutional court if its justices continued to find AKP legislation unconstitutional. But the issue is now moot. After a decade in power, Erdoğan has attained through attrition what the courts initially denied him.

Rather than enhance democracy, Western demands that Turkey subordinate its military to civilian control doomed it. Disentangling the military from politics may have been a noble goal, but stripping the generals of their role as constitutional guarantor without constructing an alternate system of checks-and-balances enhanced Erdoğan’s power beyond his wildest dreams. One in five Turkish generals are now in prison on charges that, at best, are dubious. As Erdoğan expanded party control over the police and judiciary, he turned his guns on the press. Simply lampooning Erdoğan in a political cartoon sparks retaliation. Turkey now imprisons more journalists than Iran and China and, according to Reporters Without Frontiers, ranks below Russia, Venezuela, and Zimbabwe in press freedom. Last year, police arrested investigative journalist Ahmet Şıkand and confiscated pre-publication drafts of a manuscript detailing Islamist infiltration of security forces. To rally supporters, Erdoğan embraces crude anti-American propaganda. Pew Global Attitudes Survey now finds Turkey consistently among the most anti-American countries.

With his control consolidated, Erdoğan has now dispensed with subtlety. Earlier this year, he told parliament, “We will raise a religious generation.” He forces Turkey’s minority Alevis to attend Sunni religious schools, and has flushed women from top levels of state bureaucracy. Last year, Turkey’s justice minister reported that, between 2002 and 2009, the murder rate of women increased 1,400 percent. While Erdoğan condemns Israel, the AKP gives Hamas leader Ismail Haniya a standing ovation in parliament. While former Secretary of State Colin Powell once described Turkey as a “Muslim democracy living in peace with its friends and neighbors,” in the past year Turkish officials have threatened military force against not only Syria, but also Israel, Cyprus, and Iraq.

Both President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton regularly call Turkey a model for the Middle East. It’s time to put such politically correct platitudes to rest. Turkey may be a model, but not for Muslim democracy. Rather, the AKP has demonstrated how Islamists wearing Western suits and promising democracy achieve the opposite.

Michael Rubin is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.
 
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
There is no cause for alarm. The partisan posturing of some personnages merely present the perplexing polarisation and paranoia of party politics in this fair land.
Pen pushers promoting popular prejudice while planning to pervert democratic processes deserve prison as much as other perpetrators.
Perusing the past proves present probes are part of previous practices. The people want progress, not permanent plotting, and possibly progress will come to pass in the future.

umm..with this piece of pooh i can see where you are coming from
 

eldivenci

Member
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
Oh is that what she meant. I thought she was more refined.

Apparently my purple prose has been misapprehended, and worse, I have provoked a perspicacious yet pugnacious pict who may pursue and pummel me. Alas.
 
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
Oh is that what she meant. I thought she was more refined.

Apparently my purple prose has been misapprehended, and worse, I have provoked a perspicacious yet pugnacious pict who may pursue and pummel me. Alas.

you thought ı was more refıned ..and ı thought you were more intelligent...looks like we both got it wrong
 

hachris

Member
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
...
Have you ever thought that? Why the so called international community / EU countries, hypocritical friend US does not politic pressure to AKP? Where is the so called democracy lover western states?
...
We are not minortiy we are silent majority now and just watching now in due course when we speak AKP, US and EU will be upset.

AI, stop presenting Turkey as a victim of USA's, EU's and Israel's imperialism, capitalism, hypocrisy etc. and stop blaming everybody else for the state of Turkey. You, Turkish people, voted repeatedly for AKP (and your PM), so obviously it's the majority's choice.

I personally am tired of your total disrespect of other countries. You are killing my engagement to discuss anything with political content on the forum, because in 5 minutes we are back to blame USA, EU and Israel again.
 

eldivenci

Member
Turkey is burning but what did you have tonight?
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