Mushroom

Member
The Police
Today, unfortunately it has become a case of us and them, which never used to be the case.
Times have changed and as Juco says, make a polite request to plod ask if they are recording you. If the answer is"yes", they are already out of order as they should notify you of this at the first reasonable occasion. The request for identity runs to asking plod for Surname and designation, and should also be made at the first opportunity.
In the first opportunity that plod suspects an offence, you should be cautioned and hopefully you have your own phone recording everything as early as possible.
If you are on foot, you have no legal requirement to give any details, if driving a car you are required to give name address and dob. At the first instance that an offence is mentioned or a caution given, my advice is that your only response should be "No Comment" and that should not change. Don't talk yourself into a trap.
It grieves me that this is now the case because it is the norm.
It is not the scumbag society that get the hassle, it is the law abider's who might make a simple mistake but are lumped in with the rest by guardians of the law who couldn't make decent stewards at a football match.
 
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Maisie

Member
The Police
I have put this on here before somewhere. I was stopped at approximately 7.15am one morning on the way to work, along a dual carriageway straight road with virtually no traffic in either direction. I know why I was stopped, I was speeding.

The policeman's first question was to ask if I knew the speed I was doing. I said that I thought I was doing the speed limit of 30mph. I was told that when first 'gunned' I was doing over 50, but on seeing the plod with the gun, I had braked, but was still above the limit. Okay, fair cop. I was asked for my details and licence, which I provided. I was asked where the MOT was. I pointed out that the car was only six months or so old (as could be seen from the plates) and therefore did not need one. This was ignored and I was asked to surrender my licence, for which I was given a receipt, and told that I would get a summons in the post, and when paid I would get the licence back duly marked with the points.

I think they were quite happy to see me that morning, as there as no other traffic to stop. I paid the fine and got my licence back with the points. Now so long ago that these have expired.

It makes me so angry that motorists who traverse the one way road I live in regularly behave as though they are at the Nürburgring. I am expecting that one day someone's brakes will fail at the end of the road, exit onto a dual carriageway, and there will be an almighty bang!

Our High Street is mostly pedestrianised and there are patrols, but usually these are PCSOs. I don't remember when I last saw an actual police person. Whether or not these are effective is debatable. Bicycles and motorised scooters regularly whizz up and down without being stopped. Very dangerous in my opinion. One day I am sure there will be a major incident with a member of the pedestrian public. Just hope it is not me!

Maisie
 
The Police
We need a total review of policing in this country. Police officer numbers are increasing and in some areas they will be higher than ever before. So what do we, the public want them to focus on; terrorism, mental health support, safeguarding children and vulnerable people, child and elder abuse, road safety and enforcement, schools, public order, knife crime, murder and serious/sexual assaults, cyber crime, harassment through social media, neighbourly disputes, supply of drugs, fraud, domestic abuse and property crime to name but a few.
We‘re not living in the 1970’s when officers routinely, rightly or wrongly handed out summary justice, todays policing is not perfect, but I suggest more diverse and challenging. Which of the list above can we as a society ignore?
 
The Police
Its about time Courts showed their backing for the police, physical attacks on both male and female officers should carry an automatic custodial sentence.
Its a tough bloody job from what I can see, of course there's going to be the odd iffy officers, there's iffy in any organization large or small.
I don't do blanket throwing because that equates to the good being marked as bad..........IN ALL WALKS OF LIFE.
I've no problem with being stopped by the police, likewise I've no problem phoning them if I need them.
 

Mushroom

Member
The Police
My mates daughter transitions this month from being a phlebotomist of 12 years experience to being a 'detective' in Nottingham on the princely sum of £21K a year.
As she never joined the job as a PC or completed a probation, worked the beat or had to prove herself as detective material by getting offences detected, getting arrests and convictions before applying for a CID post and successfully passing the required exams, she might well wonder why she is going to be termed as a "plastic' detective by those who are time served along the traditional route.
She might wonder why she could have had a better wage as a PCSO or at Aldi.
I do hope she isn't expecting to go to serious crimes as they occur and doesn't get bored with low level crime recording and mundane statement taking because that is about all she will be doing.
It's not her fault but the fault of a system which is trying to make the numbers up and give people job titles but not giving the pay.
A real detective would be on twice the money. A real PC the same.
Policing on the cheap will always go wrong. Plastic detectives, Pcso's and hobby bobbies are there to tick boxes, nothing else.
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
The Police
3 simple recommendations here
1. Proper sentencing, as said earlier, mandatory jail sentences for physical attacks on emergency workers
2. Ban sales of number plates (only to be issued by traffic police)
3. ID cards for all

That's Ibo abi's election manifesto
 
The Police
3 simple recommendations here
1. Proper sentencing, as said earlier, mandatory jail sentences for physical attacks on emergency workers
2. Ban sales of number plates (only to be issued by traffic police)
3. ID cards for all

That's Ibo abi's election manifesto
I’ve never fathomed out why the proposal of ID cards carries so much controversy, even more so this day and age. We’ve probably given more details of our lives on the Internet than ID cards could ever reveal.
 
The Police
I
My mates daughter transitions this month from being a phlebotomist of 12 years experience to being a 'detective' in Nottingham on the princely sum of £21K a year.
As she never joined the job as a PC or completed a probation, worked the beat or had to prove herself as detective material by getting offences detected, getting arrests and convictions before applying for a CID post and successfully passing the required exams, she might well wonder why she is going to be termed as a "plastic' detective by those who are time served along the traditional route.
She might wonder why she could have had a better wage as a PCSO or at Aldi.
I do hope she isn't expecting to go to serious crimes as they occur and doesn't get bored with low level crime recording and mundane statement taking because that is about all she will be doing.
It's not her fault but the fault of a system which is trying to make the numbers up and give people job titles but not giving the pay.
A real detective would be on twice the money. A real PC the same.
Policing on the cheap will always go wrong. Plastic detectives, Pcso's and hobby bobbies are there to tick boxes, nothing else.
The issues facing policing are recruitment and retention so I guess we should be grateful there are people like her who want to face the challenges of the role. Assuming she is a direct entry as a detective (something fairly new) she will receive the required training as you describe. Sherlock Holmes like skills aren’t necessary to solve the majority of reported crimes, the low level ones which can’t be easily solved and are filter out and filed away. The remaining less serious usually have a named suspect and my mother god bless her could probably solve them. Regarding pay, it’s true probationers earn less than PCSO’s, however from what I read the pay points have been reduced so PC/DC’s hit the top payscale in fewer years (7). A PC/DC according to the Federation website without any overtime and allowances earns just over £41,000. Its not a bad salary, but could always be improved when you consider what officers have to experience on a regular basis. A good pension meant officers did their 30 years, this is not the case now the Gov reforms have reduced pensions for public sector workers across the board. Some might say good, why should they have good pensions, remember that when inexperienced officers turn up at your house, or why their aren’t sufficient nurses to get you seen at A&E. We might need a few officers knocking about come the recession when burglary and property theft becomes fashionable again.
 

Mushroom

Member
The Police
I have already predicted that she will not last.
She will experience the pond life in their own surroundings and question why she should put up with it for such crap pay.
Recruiting is easy if you can find someone who either wants a job title or likes to wear a uniform.
That soon wears off and when their mates working in the supermarket finish work at 8pm on a Friday before they start work at 10pm for the same money and a fragmented family/social life, they don't stay.
The newbies don't last long and I can't blame them.
Unfortunately their poor pay and very restrictive pensions leads to a reluctance to work, a tendency to go sick and a don't give a crap attitude that is to the detriment of the public at large.
By the way- the pay scales now increase quicker to try and entice plod to stay.
The idea of turning up for fights in pubs with the drunks as a 60 year old doesn't work.
 

Maisie

Member
The Police
Mushroom: why did that lady give up being a phlebotomist? I would have thought that a reasonably paid job, although boring I suppose with no promotion chances.

Maisie
 

Maisie

Member
The Police
Following on: In our pedestrianised High Street this week, I saw something I have never seen before. A lady, maybe in her thirties, riding an ordinary bicycle which had a trailer attached. The trailer looked like a Tuk-Tuk, with a roof and windows. Inside were four children in two row of seats.

She was weaving in and out of the pedestrians, which included many children, as though she had right of way. No sign of even of a PCSO never mind a police person.

Maisie
 

enoch

Member
Top Poster Of Month
The Police
Following on: In our pedestrianised High Street this week, I saw something I have never seen before. A lady, maybe in her thirties, riding an ordinary bicycle which had a trailer attached. The trailer looked like a Tuk-Tuk, with a roof and windows. Inside were four children in two row of seats.

She was weaving in and out of the pedestrians, which included many children, as though she had right of way. No sign of even of a PCSO never mind a police person.

Maisie
To much of that in Alanya now Maisie, about 4 years ago one caught my wife's leg and to his dismay him and the bike ended up flat on the ground were I put him. Electric scooters are as bad with tourists.
 

yalimart

The Carnwath Massive
The Police
I haven't seen one yet but years ago I was chatting with a good mate who worked on GMP Traffic (bikes) we were discussing police radar traps and he told me they dont work in the rain, I was surprised and said are you saying that these state of the art radar guns do not work in the rain ? He said no, no I mean the police don't work in the rain. I think he meant it !
 

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