bobthenob

Non Active Member
The pantry Moth
l copied this article from a web page about the troublesome pantry moth that we have here in Turkey
l had a huge problem last year when l opened the food cabinet door and loads of these moths flew out and were flying all around the kitchen.
l checked the bags that contained the cereals and rice and found the larvae of this pest munching on what was going to be my breakfast that morning.
l now use clothes pegs to tightly seal the packaging and the ice cream tubs are used for other foods to store.
Here is the photo of this moth .



By Aubree Roche
University of Georgia

When the garden season is over and all the dried peas, beans, fruit slices and nuts are stored, watch out. Don't let the harvest you've put so much effort into end up with little "worms" in them in the dark recesses of your pantry.

Volume XXXII
Number 1
Page 24

Indian meal moths (Plodia interpunctella) are insects commonly found in household pantries. They can be a nuisance flying around the house or a pest when you find them in your food.

But don't use pesticides around your food. Use your head instead. Proper sanitation and using proper storage containers will break the life cycle of this moth and should eliminate your problem.

To prevent infestations, store pasta, flour, meal, rice, grains, seeds and other such foods in the freezer or refrigerator. Since the larvae infest dried fruits, store raisins, prunes and dried foods from your garden in insect-proof metal, glass or plastic containers.

Adult Indian meal moths are only three-eighths of an inch long. At rest, they hold their wings tent-like above their bodies. Their most striking feature is the light gray base of the wing and dark reddish, rust-like area that looks like thick bands at the tip of the wings.

The adult female moths lay their eggs on or near a source of food. The eggs are white and usually 0.3 to 0.5 millimeters long. The larvae hatch from the eggs from two days to two weeks after they're laid, depending on the temperature and humidity around them.

The larvae look like little white worms (two-thirds of an inch long at maturity) with black heads, often accompanied by silk or silken tubes. This silk is often found in infested material, with or without the larva.


The pest stage

The larval stage is the "pest" stage. Its function is to eat as much as possible and grow. When it's ready, the larva wanders from the food source, sometimes a great distance, and spins a silk cocoon. Inside this cocoon, the pupa will grow into an adult.
Adults then emerge from the cocoon, mate and lay eggs, and the cycle begins again.

If you do get Indian meal moths in your pantry, the best way to get rid of them is a good cleaning. Remove everything from your storage areas and vacuum, then wash the shelves and floor with soap and water, getting the cracks and corners where pupae and eggs could be.

It takes very little food for these insects to survive, so vacuum behind the appliances and under furniture. Go through all of the products in your pantry and remove any infested material.

Commonly, the moths are brought into the house along with wild birdseed or old pet food. If this is the case, remove them from the kitchen and out to a shed or garage.

Infested material that you don't want to get rid of can also be supercooled or superheated. Place the product in the freezer at zero degrees Fahrenheit for at least seven days, or microwave it for five minutes, or heat it in the oven at 120 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit for two hours.

When you buy new food products for the pantry, carefully inspect the packaging. Pay particular attention to the package seams.

The larvae can't chew through plastic packaging, but they can get in through seams of packaging or holes that other pantry pests may make. The best way to protect your stored food is to keep it in containers made of strong plastic, glass or even metal.

You didn't plant, grow and harvest all those garden foods to let a bunch of moths crash the pantry party.
 
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ceemac

Shake It Baby...
The pantry Moth
This moth should not of course be confused with the Chinese Takeaway Moth, Turkish Kebab Moth, or the more common Chippy Moth.

Funny you should mention moths though because at one time I actually thought I was a moth. I went into my local dentists and told him so. He said 'Good heavens man it's not me you want - I think you want the phyciatrists office next door' I said ' Yes I know, I was on my way there but your light was on' :hehe:

Sorry Bob, good post, forgive me it's my strange time of the day.


C
 
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bobthenob

Non Active Member
The pantry Moth
This moth should not of course be confused with the Chinese Takeaway Moth, Turkish Kebab Moth, or the more common Chippy Moth.

Funny you should mention moths though because at one time I actually thought I was a moth. I went into my local dentists and told him so. He said 'Good heavens man it's not me you want - I think you want the phyciatrists office next door' I said ' Yes I know, I was on my way there but your light was on' :hehe:

Sorry Bob, good post, forgive me it's my strange time of the day.


C

Well,l hope there will be more strange times for you.Humour is the best medicine for the day.And you have given out the right diagnosis all the time.

l still think you should see the shrink though,before you start head butting all the lights in the neighbourhood at night.People will start talking
 
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The pantry Moth
I've never seen a moth in Turkey so hoped that there weren't any as they scare me stiff, I'd rather encounter a snake than a moth.




Sue
 
The pantry Moth
Hi Bob

I have twice had my cupboards infested with these little blighters. No matter how much I cleaned and vacumed my cupboards they kept reappearing. I have found the only answer is to dispose of all dried foods in the house. Check any spices or dried goods bought in the markets and also any dog food. I have found moths inside sealed plastic food containers as well as glass jars. If there is larvae present in dried foods there will be a "cobweb" effect and the grains will stick together - I have even found them in my instant coffee.

The house is clear of these insects at the moment but I am infected with paranoia and spend a great part of my life checking for moths. I vacum up any live ones and disinfect and vacum my food cupboards on a regular basis. It appears once they get into the house they are very difficult to get rid of.

Veronica
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
The pantry Moth
Hi Bob

I have twice had my cupboards infested with these little blighters. No matter how much I cleaned and vacumed my cupboards they kept reappearing. I have found the only answer is to dispose of all dried foods in the house. Check any spices or dried goods bought in the markets and also any dog food. I have found moths inside sealed plastic food containers as well as glass jars. If there is larvae present in dried foods there will be a "cobweb" effect and the grains will stick together - I have even found them in my instant coffee.

The house is clear of these insects at the moment but I am infected with paranoia and spend a great part of my life checking for moths. I vacum up any live ones and disinfect and vacum my food cupboards on a regular basis. It appears once they get into the house they are very difficult to get rid of.

Veronica

They are a troublesome insect that has no compassion what so ever towards other people's groceries.Well there is hope for us yet,by thinking organic and never use any form of pesticides,since the moth can eventually become immune to the man made poison and will be more of a threat towards your weekly groceries.
This great website l found will help in ridding the little vermin from the area.
Organic Ways to Get Rid of Moths - Associated Content

Get Rid of Pantry Moths for Good! - Associated Content
 
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Tess

Member
The pantry Moth
:wow: A jar of the white moth balls which you get in the supermarket, I put them in the apt and it brings all the little blighters not only moths out of the covings and corners and they all congregate on the ceilings waiting to be "rehoused" be prepared for a shocker though, you probably havn't seen the half of them on your hol!! I leave them spread around when we do the final clean up and it keeps the little blighters at bay until your next visit, the smell of the balls very pungent though, I like it but not many do.

Bob, very interesting post on the moths, something to look out for and something I was unaware of so thanks for that!!
I'm a bit of a bug freak, they don't scare me but don't like them around cos you never know what they are doing or laying!!!
Good to know that just a thorough clean effective in getting rid of them too!
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
The pantry Moth
Tess,please be careful in using white moth balls,because they are poisonous to people and animals.
The safe solution would be to think on the basis of organic methods.
 

Tess

Member
The pantry Moth
:wow: Thanks Bob for that tip, will not be so liberal with them in future, suppose I should have realised that, anything with such a pungent smell and the way they clear the decks are most likely not so "user friendly"
Thanks Bob, and thanks again on the Pantry Moths:roundgrin
 

angiesco

Member
The pantry Moth
I am sorry to say, I don't use organic mehods for my beasties. I use Detan Maxi, every six months-everywhere. But the little mites still fly on in, not so little actually, they seem to be great big, brown, flying cockroaches. I empty out all my cupboards and wardrobes and clean them all out, wipe them all down, dry them all off an then hit them with the spray.

I am sure I clean more here in Turkey than I would if I lived in the UK. I also have regulary beastie checks in my food boxes and a check on all the packets jars and rice etc. Beasties on the brain, I am:dizzy:

What I don't know how to deal with are the wee tiny lizards that can appear from time to time. I tend to just leave them to hopefully find their own way out and they tend to be fast on their wee feet.

Angie.
 
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