immac

Senior Member Has-Been
The Investigatory Powers Bill
I know I am cynical about the base motives of politicians, and love a conspiracy theory, no matter how off the wall, but is it just coincidence that in the week preceding the discussion of the new Investigatory Powers Bill we are told about "significant chatter" alerting spooks to possibility of another attack?

We have seen governments do this before: Blaire famously parked tanks on the lawns outside Heathrow Airport just as they were running into trouble with a similar Bill, and as soon as the vote was won, the tanks went home.

We are now being told that it is essential that everyone in UK has all their internet activity freely available to police for up to a year - although to get to the real data they will need a court order - so no protection at all there. Britain truly is a Police State, but how much more intrusive can they get?

So, to shut up the opposition, we are presented with a real and present danger that shows just why we (you - I don´t live there) should trust them with everything we do: security trumps privacy.

Nazi, Joseph Goebbels, is credited with the "Nothing to hide, Nothing to fear" argument, which is almost impossible to defend without looking guilty.

Are we being duped again?

Ian
 

ted j

Member
The Investigatory Powers Bill
Just one of the reasons I got out ...best thing I ever did
 

Kanga

Member
The Investigatory Powers Bill
They are welcome to look at mine. I cannot imagine that they have any interest, or even the staff available, to check everyone' every keystroke. What they do want is the ability to collect enough evidence to stop atrocities against innocent people.
 

JanetClarke

JanetClarke
The Investigatory Powers Bill
They are welcome to look at mine. I cannot imagine that they have any interest, or even the staff available, to check everyone' every keystroke. What they do want is the ability to collect enough evidence to stop atrocities against innocent people.
Welcome to look at my boring stuff too.
It was the damn computer that nailed the most vile pedophile local to me.
Believe me, vile is not a strong enough word to describe this individual.
 

juco

Member
The Investigatory Powers Bill
They are not welcome to look at mine anymore than they are welcome to look in my house or a supermarket or whatever that wants my post code, and a whole host of other things.

Given time they will create reasons to knock on your door, innocent as you may be!
 

Spurs

Spurs
The Investigatory Powers Bill
If they look at mine they might suggest I find a pen friend.

Snoop on the individuals by all means but what about arresting the people they already know about?
 

Spurs

Spurs
The Investigatory Powers Bill
The problem is our pathetic penalties, followed by the struggles on deportation. I for one would be quite happy to send by force if necessary convicted terrorists back to their native lands REGARDLESS of what treatment awaits them. Home grown needs to be severely dealt with.
I do have concerns about MY surveillance but if I have to concede that to catch the tw*ts then so be it. I look at new cars now with trackers & cameras fitted, someone knows where & when we are moving now.
Question: Recently a British citizen was released from the US after 14 years & never charged, not a squeak from the UK Government Oh they went through the motions but 14 years & no charge? Was they justified, if so why are we not doing that?
 

immac

Senior Member Has-Been
The Investigatory Powers Bill
When I wrote the first post and put in, "Britain truly is a Police State, but how much more intrusive can they get?", I was expecting a reaction from the people who welcome such intrusion on private life, but not a squeak. Have you all just given up and accepted that Big Brother (and that is not the TV show!) wields total power "for its own sake" over the inhabitants of your country? Have they so frightened you into submission?

Ian
 

teosgirl

Member
The Investigatory Powers Bill
Just one of the reasons I got out ...best thing I ever did

Really? Where did you go to? I hope you're not suggesting Turkey is 'more free' than the UK Ted :)

Turkey can monitor and store individual internet use for up to 2 years.
The bill was passed rapidly in 2014 at the time of the corruption scandal case.

Turkey's new Internet law contradicts its EU ambitions - Al-Monitor: the Pulse of the Middle East

Freedom House report on Internet freedom puts the UK in the 'free' category with a low score of 24 and Turkey at last place in the 'partly free' category with a score of 58 - two points lower than the 'not free' category where Kazakhstan holds a score of 61.

https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-net/freedom-net-2015

I used to have a problem with this kind of surveillance but I'm slowly realising that the UK is moderate compared to some countries, including the one I currently reside in.


Charlotte
 

ted j

Member
The Investigatory Powers Bill
I wrote it was Just one of the reasons I got out , there were numerous others , being ripped off by the energy companies, TV licence , water rates etc etc
Even the cost of a night out was getting ridiculous with taxi fares of £16 return every time we wanted to go out
We were in a local bar last night, it cost us 80 lira for drinks (@ £18) and we got a free lift home
 
Last edited:

kibris

Member
The Investigatory Powers Bill
I wrote it was Just one of the reasons I got out , there were numerous others , being ripped off by the energy companies, TV licence , water rates etc etc
Even the cost of a night out was getting ridiculous with taxi fares of £16 return every time we wanted to go out
We were in a local bar last night, it cost us 80 lira for drinks (@ £18) and we got a free lift home

exactly so--just paıd my very late councıl tax here ın kusadasi--ıt was 243lıra for the year.
 

Latest Posts

Top Bottom