Talking of insects.
I am feeding TheCat when I see it. About six inches long and a bright orange colour. Ohh look, I think.

“Ohh look,” I say, calling MyWife.

“Kill it,” she says, and calls her mother, who is staying with us. MyWifesMother says something in Turkish which I don’t need anyone to translate for me. She has said kill it too.

“It’s an akrep! It’s very poisonous. Kill it!”

“It’s a what?” I ask, staring at it with renewed interest.

“I can’t think of the English word! Just Kill it.”

I was thinking of getting my camera and taking its picture but there seems to be some urgency involved in this Death Race. I pick up a shoe and bash it to a paste on the floor.

“Well done,” says MyWife. I have just saved my family from certain death.

Later MyWife says “Scorpion! That’s the word. It was a scorpion.”

No it wasn’t. I am not a native and not a naturalist but I have seen heavy metal record covers and know that it wasn’t a scorpion. I quietly look at some pictures on the internet. No not those sort of pictures!

“It was a centipede,” I tell MyWife, showing here a picture. “Not a scorpion.”

“Oh well,” she says.
 

dalyansteve

Member
Talking of insects.
Yes thank you for that info kkob, we get both skorpions,brown ones, and the centipede thing which I find take an awfull lot of bashing with the size 10's or 44's if we are talking Turkish. Never quite sure what to do with the skorpions though, usually send them down the loo. Can you tell us, what should we do if stung by either of these? I am particularly allergic to insect stings and as the only driver it is something that worries me a bit.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Talking of insects.
Yes thank you for that info kkob, we get both skorpions,brown ones, and the centipede thing which I find take an awfull lot of bashing with the size 10's or 44's if we are talking Turkish. Never quite sure what to do with the skorpions though, usually send them down the loo. Can you tell us, what should we do if stung by either of these? I am particularly allergic to insect stings and as the only driver it is something that worries me a bit.

Here is a link that has some great ideas on what to do when stung.

First Aid for Bug Bites - How to Treat Bug Bites - Treating Insect Bites and Stings
 

CJD

Member
Talking of insects.
Useful site Bob

Is this Scolopendra Cingulatus more commonly known as
40 legs?
 

dngood

Member
Talking of insects.
Well, if it was a big centipede it was probably Scolopendra Cingulatus and just as nasty as your average Turkish scorpion. A bite from one could put you in hospital.

Here's a picture of one:
http://www.petbugs.com/caresheets/gallery/S-cingulata.jpg

Thanks KKOB, I didn't realise they were nasty - I spent an afternoon photographing one last week:

Centipede-friendly_Vga.jpg

Thanks for the warning!

Dave.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Talking of insects.
l copied this from the pet bug.com giving out very useful information on this type of centipede of what to do when confronted with one and having ideas of keeping it as a pet.
Here is a photo of one
14spg2b.jpg


The Megarian Banded Centipede is a truly unique centipede species! Unlike some of their tropical cousins in the genus Scolopendra, these pretty little centipedes are reputed to have mild venom. Due to their relatively diminutive size, Megarian Banded Centipedes are easier to handle than most species out on the market. Bigger is not always better, because the Megarian Banded Centipede is one of the best beginner Scolopendra species to keep in captivity! Another thing that sets Megarian Banded Centipedes apart from others is their range. The Megarian Banded Centipede is one of the few Scolopendra species found throughout southern Europe. The color intensity of these centipedes vary slightly, depending on where they are found. The specimen in the photo to the left was found in an olive field in southeastern Greece, and it has rather bright body coloration. Megarian Banded Centipedes would make the perfect starter species, unfortunately this species is a rare sight in the United States. Nevertheless, the Megarian Banded Centipede can be enjoyed by a hobbyist of any experience level for its' practical size, its' pretty appearance, and its' usual voracious Scolopendra appetite!

Range Mountainous regions of the Mediterranean, including Spain, France, Italy, Greece, and North Africa.
Type Burrowing.
Diet Babies will eat pinhead crickets, or other small insects. Adults will consume almost any creature that is not larger that itself, including large crickets, other large insects, and small lizards.
Full Grown Size 4 to 4.5 inches.
Growth Medium speed.
Temperature 75 to 90° F.
Humidity 75 to 80%.
Temperament Aggressive and active.
Housing Babies can live in a roomy clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 2.5 to 5-gallon tank. The tank should be twice as long, and at least as wide as the individual. Floor space is as important as height. In this case, the height is not important for climbing, just to prevent escapes by the centipede running up the side of the tank.
Substrate 3 to 4 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor No decorations are really needed, but you can add rocks, or cork bark.
Other Names Mediterranean Banded Centipede.

*Please note that ALL centipedes have a certain amount of venom. Although most people are not seriously affected by this species, some people may be allergic to the venom, or just more sensitive, making it a dangerous situation. This is one of the reasons that people should not handle this centipede. Affects of this centipedes' natural defenses may vary between people. All centipedes should be considered dangerous, so be careful, because you don't want to find out if you are allergic or more sensitive the HARD WAY!
 
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Talking of insects.
My son, currently at our place in Yalikavak, just sent me the following text:

"Just captured a creature from the kitchen about inch and a half long, a bit like a catapillar but with about 20 daddy long legs type legs and massive fangs on the front and coloured a bit like a brown and cream shrimp thing, any idea what it is?"

I'm hoping it isn't one of the Scolopendra Cingulatus that KayaKoyuOldBoy mentioned previously.

If it isn't the Scolopendra Cingulatus, anyone any ideas what it is and if it is dangerous?

Any info may (or may not) stop his girlfriend worrying.

Thanks
 

KKOB

Completely Chillaxed
Talking of insects.
Go on..................You know you want to ! :roundgrin
 

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