ceemac

Shake It Baby...
Spoken English in Turkey
The English language is very popular amongst not only the Turkish elite, but also ordinary Turks, particularly the youth.

Television, cinema (particularly American movies), the internet, tourism, and the economic integration of Turkey into the global economy are probably the main reasons why the language has become so widely spoken.

Interestingly, a 'hybrid' language has evolved called Tarzanca, which is a mixture of Turkish and English. Even in television, some speakers will announce an art exhibition for example, in Tarzanca.

Also, younger Turks commonly use English expressions, such as part-time, fulltime, prime time, art, cool, etc.

The growing popularity of satellite tv where the foreign shows and films are dominantly american is having a significant impact on the popularity of English.

The Law of Radio and Television, and RTUK (Higher Council of Radio and Television), are set up to regulate TV and radio programs but there are no limits or control on the extensive use of English in programs.

There are 12 members in RTUK responsible for the supervision of TV and radio programs - 3 out of the 12 are chosen and appointed by the President. 2 of the rest are suggested by the Higher Education Council and 3 of them by Higher Council of Turkish Culture, Language and History. One member is chosen by the Security Council and is appointed by the Council of Ministers.
Each of the last 3 members must be prominent people from the press and education and economy sectors.

The main part of their remit is to ensure;

1-The constitutional language, which is Turkish, should be the language used in programs.

2-In programs, the elements of Turkish-Islamic ethics and Turkish- Islamic world view will be given a significant place.

3-On Turkish history, historical values, Turkish way of life, thoughts and feelings, interesting and convincing programs will be made.

It seems that for RTUK members however, the increasing use of English and the increasing number of foreign, especially of American shows, and American movies that prominently show the American way of life are not a threat to Turkish language and culture. RTUK, like many other higher councils in Turkey, are mostly concerned about programs that threaten the unity of the state and its people, basic characteristics of democracy, public order, general ethical norms and security.

I would have thought there are bound to be concerns though about the impact this is having on Turkish culture etc, or has it already gone too far?


C
 
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Akasya

Postless Pointer
Spoken English in Turkey
Very similar the the situation in France, they are also far too late. The whole world will end up speaking an Americanised Hispanic / substitute local language / patois. I blame the famous Actor / Politician / Linguist, Arnie " i'll be back " Schwarzenegger, and the other male youth icon Sylvester Stallone.

Steve.
 
Spoken English in Turkey
all too little too late..and the English language that they are learning isn't really English but more and more text speak 'going to 'is now 'gona' we were is 'we wuz' ,you is u ..
theres loads more like this...
if we all come back in a hundred years time English will be as alien to us as Chaucers English is to us now.
 

carolk

R.I.P
Spoken English in Turkey
I tend to agree Shirley, its a bit too late (for us all).

A lot of it comes from AAE (African American English) or Ebonics which I heard a lot of at work. I tried for a while to study it and gave up lol.
 

pebble

Member
Spoken English in Turkey
Would a universally understood "world language" be such a bad thing???

its been tried....

we used to speak tarzanca when we were kids....... we had no idea that words we were using were in fact english....ha ha hahaha
especially singing songs in english and not having a clue what the words were cause we bastardised them so bad........
 

ceemac

Shake It Baby...
Spoken English in Turkey
A couple of years ago when we were out at our place for the family holiday, a Turkish friend arranged for us to get into a private part of the new marina, even sending their coach to pick us up.

You normally had to pay to get into this 'special' area where there were huge lounging cushions, a cordoned off swimming area, and a bar with waiter service.

There were a number of very well-to-do looking Turks there and we had our kids with us who were 14 and 12 then.

Western pop music was blasting out of the speakers but they played a number of songs the words of which were really sexually explicit and full of swearing.

We got so uncomfortable that we had to leave after about half an hour, but all the Turkish people didn't bat an eye at the music!

It's a funny story to tell now but at the time we just felt really embarrassed and uncomfortable as our kids were there.

C
 
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pebble

Member
Spoken English in Turkey
Well Ceemac, you know of course they had no idea what the words were...........

ignorance is bliss...isnt it?
 

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