bobthenob

Non Active Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
The Turkish loves to see you try and speak their language because it gives them a good laugh.
I was at my Turkish neighbour’s yesterday having tea and breakfast with with them.There was grandma sitting in her favourite place and husband and wife sitting at the table with me trying to make each other out on what we are on about.
I do know a bit about the language and was trying to talk about the swine flu.The neighbour was coughing and making impersonations of a pig with oinking sounds referring to the countries that has this flu.Then l said”AHH,Yes”!,Big problem all over the world,when in fact l really wanted to say that it is a conspiracy to put fear into the global communities for reasons that cannot be explained,because the political system works in mysterious ways.
Then l said in Turkish that 2 years ago was the bird flu.And l forgot the word for bird,so l was flapping my arms coughing and spluttering mimicking a sick bird..AHH!,yes they say.l know.They just rolled up and the grandma was in stitches.
I was helping him how to express the word bird in English and he just couldn’t pronounce the letter D.With his concentrated face all that came out was burrrr..

I go in the shops and try speaking the language only to be met with a lot of smiles and laughter,which l was laughing as well.

What experience have you come across when trying to speak the language.Was it sometimes embarrassing,when you realized what you said.
And did you have to express something physically to get your meaning over.

lt certainly can be funny when trying to learn the language.l remember when l first came here and wanted some eggs.l was clucking away in a mini market and crouched down pretending to lay an egg.The customers that were their and staff were in stitches.Well they haven't forgotten me that day and always smile at me mimicking a chicken when they see me.
 

nanamo

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
It wasnt until I had to buy clothes pegs and some secatures that i realised the hand gestures were the same - both the shop keeper and myself were in stiches and he was getting everything out - i could see he was wondering what on earth this strage English person wanted. When I got back home we found the secatures were not going to cope with the thick branches and we would need garden shears - I sent the kids back to the shop with a picture. lol Molly x
 
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maggie

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
Bob I totally agree with you on this one .

I do try my best to speak Turkish in shops,dolmus,and the local market.

I suposse Im lucky as apart from one English couple the whole of the sitesi are Turkish and not a lot of them speak any English.Trying to speak Turkish is a daily occurrence for me.Gradually over the last 18 months my Turkish is getting better but there has been a lot of sign language,hand flapping and very odd little acts on my behalf.

The best one is when I was trying to say I wanted some batteries for my clock, they kept saying Pill Pill, I kept telling them No I wasentt hasta (sick)I needed batteries.I was going tick tock then cutting actions at my throat pretending Id killed myself (Dead).

After empyting more or less the entire contents of the sitetsi little shop we eventually found Pills(Batteries)hidden away in a little box under the till.

To me to see the delight on a Turkish persons face when you can say Merhaba (Hello) to them makes living here worth while.

Hugs Maggie xxxx
 
Speaking Turkish Unites
At the beginning I felt useless and embarassed when I would go alone to somewhere, when shopping I would just show to something I wanted and say "Kach?-How much" instead of Ne kadar? It was big fun when would go to the vegetable pazar, and first time in my life I learned bargaining, I felt a bit shy to bargain, but for my teenage daughter it was real fun. As daughter was speaking turkish (at that time little) it was appreciated and everyone loved that. I noticed that turks never would say "Sorry, I am in hurry", if you ask something everyone would be ready to help, to show, to guide. Conversations turn to be a funny mix of body language, english, turkish, sometimes even Tarzan and baby language, and so much laugh from both sides! But I am still shy of poor vocabulary, and bad grammar, so would speak when just must! Ha ha
 

Firebrand

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
I once ran into a shop at a bus station with about two minutes to spare before I got my bus. I asked the man behind the counter for 'sicak su' lutfen. He looked slightly startled, but ambled off to put the kettle on. It was only when the kettle was starting to boil and he clearly wondered what he was supposed to do with the hot water for me that the penny audible dropped in my head and I realised I'd got my hot and cold mixed up (again).

I don't think he even charged me for the bottle of cold water that I used to cover my red face!
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
Sorry to say but speaking Turkish does not unite!

I've just been to the coffee bar upstairs and tried ordering my afternoon latte in Turkish and the lovely young Polish girl who runs the counter said I was wasting her time by not making sense and promptly threw me out! :(


Hah..good one..l wonder what you said to be thrown out.
 

zuberdust

IM THE BESTEST :)
Speaking Turkish Unites
take no offence people please -
but i love to hear british/american pronounce middle eastern or foreign words.... they always pronounce it like its an english word and it just sounds soo funny! heeheheh

Bob I totally agree with you on this one .

I do try my best to speak Turkish in shops,dolmus,and the local market.

I suposse Im lucky as apart from one English couple the whole of the sitesi are Turkish and not a lot of them speak any English.Trying to speak Turkish is a daily occurrence for me.Gradually over the last 18 months my Turkish is getting better but there has been a lot of sign language,hand flapping and very odd little acts on my behalf.

The best one is when I was trying to say I wanted some batteries for my clock, they kept saying Pill Pill, I kept telling them No I wasentt hasta (sick)I needed batteries.I was going tick tock then cutting actions at my throat pretending Id killed myself (Dead).

After empyting more or less the entire contents of the sitetsi little shop we eventually found Pills(Batteries)hidden away in a little box under the till.

To me to see the delight on a Turkish persons face when you can say Merhaba (Hello) to them makes living here worth while.

Hugs Maggie xxxx
wow u live in turkey? u never told me that!


p.s how do i combine my above post with this 1..... i got told off for that b4.....
 
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Firebrand

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
take no offence people please -
but i love to hear british/american pronounce middle eastern or foreign words.... they always pronounce it like its an english word and it just sounds soo funny! heeheheh

Would you think it was helpful if someone made those kind of comments when you were speaking in a language that was foreign to you?

Sorry if this comes across as sour grapes, but I think it is brilliant when foreigners try to speak the language of the country they are in, perfect accent or not, and I personally don't think it is helpful to be snide when they do. My attempts at Turkish may confuse shopkeepers, but I have never had it received with anything but encouragement.
 

maggie

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
Zuberdust why should I tell you where I live ????

Being a TLF I thought you might have worked it out for yourself,

Hugs Maggie.
 
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whirley

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
Sorry to say but speaking Turkish does not unite!

I've just been to the coffee bar upstairs and tried ordering my afternoon latte in Turkish and the lovely young Polish girl who runs the counter said I was wasting her time by not making sense and promptly threw me out! :(

LOL ............. thanks for making me laugh ............ sorry you were thrown out

but you what a chuckle factor your story has LOL
 

Guz1

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
One of my family went to the local shop to buy a bottle of vinegar. Her first visit to Turkey, she was making an effort to fit in and practiced her Turkish sentence all the way to the shop. The dictionary didn't tell her that the Turkish words for vinegar and nits are very similar. To this day the shopkeeper scratches his head and laughs every time he sees her.
 

zuberdust

IM THE BESTEST :)
Speaking Turkish Unites
Would you think it was helpful if someone made those kind of comments when you were speaking in a language that was foreign to you?

Sorry if this comes across as sour grapes, but I think it is brilliant when foreigners try to speak the language of the country they are in, perfect accent or not, and I personally don't think it is helpful to be snide when they do. My attempts at Turkish may confuse shopkeepers, but I have never had it received with anything but encouragement.

omg! stop being so sensetive! it was said in a light hearted way!... thankfully i have a foreign tongue and can pronounce many languages except chinese or japanese lol....
and i dont laf at ppl.. i said it funny.. i never said i will humiliate them
 

nanamo

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
Just got to tell you this ................... my friends 5 year old grandaughter thought that all the Turkish babies were so clever because they could speak Turkish and she was still trying to learn. Molly x
 

peter the postie

Wer'e not really here
Speaking Turkish Unites
I'll never forget when our friends came over for a holiday. We went into didim for a slap up meal, and my friend is always one to immerse himself and have a go.
The bill came and went, and on our way out he thanked the waiter in his attempted Turkish native tongue....... "Testicular" :kafa:
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
l'll never forget a British tourist in a hardware shop,explaining the paint that needs to be done and what paint to use.This Turkish guy help him immensely on what to buy.
Well!,the British guy was so pleased..he said..Topman..that means in turkish..homo.lt was the exspression that made me roll up
 
Speaking Turkish Unites
not a Turkish-related gaffe... but when I moved to Holland 15 years ago I went to Dutch lessons. Oh My Goodness. We all had to take a turn to stand up and say "Ik ben...." which means "I am.." and then add something at the end. The word for 'tired' is 'moe' (pronounced moo). I got my vocabulary mixed up and proudly stood up and told the whole class.. "Ik ben mooi" - "I am beautiful". Red face for about 3 or 4 lessons after that.
 

Manda

Member
Speaking Turkish Unites
l'll never forget a British tourist in a hardware shop,explaining the paint that needs to be done and what paint to use.This Turkish guy help him immensely on what to buy.
Well!,the British guy was so pleased..he said..Topman..that means in turkish..homo.lt was the exspression that made me roll up

That's so funny! We have come across this one too. Unfortunately my boyfriend was always telling people they are a "topman" until our Turkish friend pointed out what it meant....
Anyone from Turkey must have real laugh in a UK high street with Top Shop & Top Man!
 

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