ceemac

Shake It Baby...
Repatriation Issues
This is an interesting article from the perspective of those (very few!) who have moved to Turkey (or anywhere else), and have decided that maybe it isn't for them.

This probably won't be read by too many :lol:


C
 
Repatriation Issues
Very interesting article, C. The only alternative to families repatriating is private education, which is in most cases not affordable. I worked for many years in a private school here in The Netherlands where the International Baccalaureate was taught. These kids are mostly 'global nomads' whose parents work for the big corporations. When being repatriated in the middle of the programme and quite often not being afforded the education grant in their home countries, the kids don't get challenged in their national education systems. My experience is that these children, in their last couple of years at school aren't wondering if they will get into university, they're actually assessing which university they'll go to. Coming from Scotland and being in secondary school in the 80s, this was a far cry from what choices we had. On the other hand, the Dutch schooling system allows for 12 year olds to choose which school they go to, depending on what result they achieved in their last year of primary school. It lends for the kids working hard to get into the school of their choice and also for the schools to make sure that their staff are performing well in order to attract more kids. Kind of a nicer position to be in I think.
 

ceemac

Shake It Baby...
Repatriation Issues
That sounds kind of like the Grammar School system though doesn't it?


C
 
Repatriation Issues
the Dutch system or the IB?

The Dutch have been consistently in the top 10 European nations for their standard of eduction. My kids did Dutch primary and the oldest went on to do the IB - the youngest opting for the Dutch system.

The IB was set up as a system for 'mobile' families, where they could slot in to the system anywhere in the world. It starts from age 5 and finishes when they're 18. They're really taught social awareness as well as educational importance and you end up getting the all-round student. International Baccalaureate (IB)
 

ceemac

Shake It Baby...
Repatriation Issues
Sorry, the Dutch system I meant - like the old 11 plus where the 'brighter' or harder working kids got to go to a 'better' school.


C
 
Repatriation Issues
yeah, that's exactly what it's like. There are, however, different levels of education in each school. The boys who are not so bright can go to woodwork school or metalwork school etc., and the girls can learn retail or catering or hairdressing which then allows them to be qualified enough to get onto a college course. While they're in the secondary schools, they can always 'jump up' a level. There are many different layers for them to choose from, so there are very few kids who leave school without a qualification.
 

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