juco

Member
Mushroom identification.
I have identified this as an edible puffball found in garden. (Scotland)
I would like to eat them, anyone got any knowledge on mushrooms to confirm they are edible.
 

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Mushroom identification.
I have identified this as an edible puffball found in garden. (Scotland)
I would like to eat them, anyone got any knowledge on mushrooms to confirm they are edible.

If in doubt...…...bin them. Don't tempt fate or advice from a forum J.
I'm a hunter gatherer when it come to mushrooms, straight off the shelf in Sainsbury's. Dirt cheap.
 

juco

Member
Mushroom identification.
Missus point blank refuses to eat them!

Googling appears to point to being edible:

There is one good way to tell puffballs apart from its poisonous look-a-likes, you must cut the mushroom in half from top to bottom. The inside of edible puffball mushrooms should be pure white, like a marshmallow, or like fresh mozzarella balls, there should be no patterns, or marks or colors or anything other than pure white, and especially no signs of gills. If you follow this one rule you should be able to enjoy mushroom hunting for puffball mushrooms without worry.
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Mushroom identification.
They are edible, I have eaten them, there is also a giant puffball, one slice would fill a dinner plate, I have seen them but never found one myself. Afiyet Olsun.
 
Mushroom identification.
Missus point blank refuses to eat them!

Googling appears to point to being edible:

Before eating I would suggest you also Google what the symptoms are if you eat the wrong ones, along with the treatment one may face thereafter.
There used to be a sign by the doors on Midland Red buses in Birmingham and it’s always stuck with me.
It said, “Take care, don’t chance it”
 

immac

Senior Member Has-Been
Mushroom identification.
Don't chance it: death or severe organ failure if you are wrong. As most mushrooms have hardly any taste - only what you cook them in - why bother?

Ian
 

Kanga

Member
Mushroom identification.
Don't know if this is the case in Turkey, and can't find out from Wales, but in France you can take your pickings to a pharmacy and they will identify them for you.
 

juco

Member
Mushroom identification.
I doubt it in the UK.
I did get a reply from the wildfood uk forum which pretty much confirms it is edible.

This looks very much to be part of the Puffball family, I suspect it to be the stump Puffball. Generally Puffballs are edible with a rare exception
which looks very different, grey and fluffy.

https://www.wildfooduk.com/mushroom-guide/common-puffball/

https://www.wildfooduk.com/articles/the-puffballs/

Please note that we can never be 100% certain of an ID from photos alone.

Interestingly at around 12 years old I used to help a Lithuanian guy go pick mushrooms, he gave me some simple guidelines and we then picked several bags full and my mother used to make a meal from them, mushrooms/onions and bacon fried up and served.
From memory I recall them being boiled for a long time prior to cooking, maybe this destroyed any poisons.
I can still remember the taste which I thought was delicious.
Unfortunately I cant remember what his criteria was for picking them but we never had any issues with them.
This guy escaped from the Russians during the war and was from a peasant background and used to living off the land as were many of them that landed in the UK after/during the war.
 

Maisie

Member
Mushroom identification.
I too have a book on mushrooms. I think this is more confusing as there are pictures of more types of mushrooms than I thought existed.

There are huge ones growing in the grounds of the hospital Dave is in. But they do appear to be growing near trees. I remember reading somewhere that 'mushrooms' or 'toadstools' (what is the difference?) will grow on dead tree roots. We certainly had this in our garden after a deceased cherry tree was cut down. You could follow the path of the roots by following the 'mushrooms'!

Appealing though it sounds, I don't think I would chance eating any growing wild - just in case.

Maisie
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Mushroom identification.
I have not been able to sleep for days wondering the fate of the puffballs, did you eat them? I found some in the garden yesterday, they were delicious, no bacon sadly
 
Mushroom identification.
I doubt it in the UK.
I did get a reply from the wildfood uk forum which pretty much confirms it is edible.



Interestingly at around 12 years old I used to help a Lithuanian guy go pick mushrooms, he gave me some simple guidelines and we then picked several bags full and my mother used to make a meal from them, mushrooms/onions and bacon fried up and served.
From memory I recall them being boiled for a long time prior to cooking, maybe this destroyed any poisons.
I can still remember the taste which I thought was delicious.
Unfortunately I cant remember what his criteria was for picking them but we never had any issues with them.
This guy escaped from the Russians during the war and was from a peasant background and used to living off the land as were many of them that landed in the UK after/during the war.


Chasey is yer man on here, he seems to know plenty about the wilds, he might even throw in half a stag to go with the mushrooms.
Mate I like to know what's on my plate has been tried & tested by others......don't be one of the "others" just for the sake of mushrooms.

We was told diesel engines were safe by some organisation & we know how that turned out.
 

juco

Member
Mushroom identification.
I have not been able to sleep for days wondering the fate of the puffballs, did you eat them?

Having got a positive identification I did try just one (just in case) it wasn't great and by the time I peeled the skin off (which is tough) there wasn't much to eat so more bother than worth. Maybe some of the larger puffballs would have been better as these were quite small.

Anyhow still alive and kicking :smile:
 
Mushroom identification.
Having got a positive identification I did try just one (just in case) it wasn't great and by the time I peeled the skin off (which is tough) there wasn't much to eat so more bother than worth. Maybe some of the larger puffballs would have been better as these were quite small.

Anyhow still alive and kicking :smile:

Great....wouldn’t have wanted to see a gravestone with the words, “Here lies Juco, died of puffballs”.
Could mean anything lol
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Mushroom identification.
Don't peel the skin off, we never do, even with bought commercial one. We just wash and trim. We wash the ones in our field very carefully as the dogs may well have 'visited'
 

juco

Member
Mushroom identification.
Don't peel the skin off
I dont normally but the skin on these ones are quite tough, in fact it doesn't peel off, its a bit like a potato skin which has to be pared off with a sharp knife. After that is done there is not much left as they are quite small.
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Mushroom identification.
I once watched a murder mystery where the whole family ate the same amount of the same meal. Only one of them died. they had included mushroom with the meal. they gathered it from the roadside, shaggy inkcaps (Coprinus Comatus), we have them in our field, you find them alongide motorways in the UK. the clever bit was, that the mushroom is edible, but poisoness when taken with alcohol. Only the intended victim died, as he was the only one who consumed alcohol. Clever eh?
 
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juco

Member
Mushroom identification.
shaggy inkcaps..............I have had them a couple of years back, fortunately I was aware of the alcohol warning although I think generally it just makes you ill.
I believe there are some others where alcohol can be a problem.
 

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