Useful Information

Courtesy of Doc Martin © Doc Martin 2017


Disclaimer: The information here is provided as a general guide. Whilst every effort is made to ensure that the information is up to date and accurate, information given here from the Turkish Government, DGMM, GOC, British Consulate & other official websites may be subject to change at any time.

Before committing to purchasing, you should check the vehicles history.
This can be done via your Turkish phone by text.
Put in the vehicles registration number and send to 5664 (not a free service).
Also, click here to see what else you can check on the vehicle (each equiry involves a fee)

Buying a car here is quite painless. If you buy new then the dealer will do all the running around for you.
If second hand then you go to a Noters office with the seller & carry out the purchase there with an Official court translator present. It seems customary for the buyer to pay all the fees, but that is really up to you both to decide.

The notary clerk enters all information (names and ID numbers of seller and buyer, vehicle registration details, agreed sales price) into the online (ARTES) system. Once all information is entered correctly, the system produces a sales agreement which is signed by both parties. Then, the system delivers a document with the new number plate number, which entitles the buyer to have his number plates printed at the local Chamber of Drivers/Şoförler Odası (subject to a fee).
The system then prints the new car/motorbike papers.
With this document, the new owner can purchase the compulsory traffic insurance, prior to obtaining the number plate at the Şoförler Odası.
Checks are made by the Noter prior to the sales document being produced that there are no debts on the vehicle. This includes unpaid fines and no tax, insurance or TUV (MOT) test. All vehicles presented for sale must have current valid tax, insurance and TUV.

As the buyer you will need your passport ( plus translated & noterised copy), valid Residence/Work permit, or now many Noters will accept just your 99**** Ikamet number, even if your RP has expired (This ‘may’ vary depending on the Noter, so check first if they insist on seeing a valid RP card or not).

If buying from a Turkish Citizen, after completing the Noters paperwork you will need a new registration plate number, for that you go to your local Chamber of Drivers/Şoförler Odası (subject to a fee) to have them made.
If buying from another foreigner, the vehicle will already be on ‘foreigners plates (MA>MB>MC…etc) so will not need new plates after the sale.

When putting the car onto foreigners ‘M’ plates only the persons named on the Ruhsat (logbook) & spouse can legally drive the car, this can ONLY be family of the same surname, NOT friends.

Please note it is 100% illegal for a Turkish citizen to drive an ‘M’ plated car/scooter

BE AWARE that if you put the cars’ Ruhsat into a Turkish friends name so it has ‘Turkish number plates & not ‘M’ plates allowing anyone to drive it the car IS NOT YOURS and that person can sell it without your permission and keep the money! Just like a Tapu, if it’s not in your name,you are not the legal owner !

It is not possible to have a Ruhsat in joint names with a Turkish citizen.

As of 2/4/2018 the Noters office (not Trafic Polis) will deal with issuing new registration plate numbers (Plaka) if required.

As of September 1st 2019 anyone buying a second hand car in Turkey will have to obtain traffic insurance immediately.
The law that the buyer can use the seller’s car insurance for a 15-day grace before getting the insurance has come to an end.

As of 01/02/2020 Notary services (especially for the purchase and sale of used vehicles), will use a secure payment system that is coming into effect on 1st February.

The money for transactions will be placed into an escrow account then it will be transferred safely to the person concerned after the completion of the notary paperwork. However notary fees can still be paid by credit card or debit card.

The sales money will not be transferred to the seller’s account until the notary transaction has been performed. The risk of the seller not coming to the notary or not performing the transaction at the notary will be eliminated. The cost of the second hand vehicle will be held in the escrow account and after the sale and all paperwork has been agreed will pass to the sellers account, therefore the problem of trust will be eliminated.

If the parties cannot agree on the sale and either of them cancel the transaction, the money deposited by the buyer in the escrow account will be returned to the original bank account. It is hoped that this new process will avoid any disputes coming to the judiciary.

TUV Test (MOT) is every 2 years as is emissions test, unless you own a van or Kangoo, Doblo, Connect etc, which are classed as commercials and need tests annually (also the maximum speed limit allowed is lower).
INSURANCE You must BY LAW have at least 3rd party Trafic Sigorta which is compulsory, if you want fully comprehensive (Kasko) then you purchase that on top of the basic 3rd party cover.
ROAD TAX is due in January & June (if wishing to pay 6 months at a time) or you can pay for the whole year in January only.
 

Tenpin

The Yorkshireman
Motoring - Buying A Vehicle in Turkey
An update to this based on our personal experience.

We bought our car in 2009 and have just sold it.

The problem we ran into at the noter was that both myself and my wife were named on the ruhsat (which we were told to do so we could both drive the car), but there was no mention on the ruhsat as to what percentage of the vehicle we each owned.
The noter sent us to the tax office to sort the problem, the tax office sent us back to the noter.
The noter then sent an email to someone in Ankara (not sure if the tax head office or some other office/department) asking them to sort the issue.

It took a total of 4 days for them to assign 50-50 share of the car so that it could be sold.

We have since spoken to a few friends and this has been an issue for a number of years when two people are named on the ruhsat, which we were not aware of.

Our advice to anyone buying a vehicle which you both would drive is to have it only in one persons name.
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Motoring - Buying A Vehicle in Turkey
An update to this based on our personal experience.

We bought our car in 2009 and have just sold it.

The problem we ran into at the noter was that both myself and my wife were named on the ruhsat (which we were told to do so we could both drive the car), but there was no mention on the ruhsat as to what percentage of the vehicle we each owned.
The noter sent us to the tax office to sort the problem, the tax office sent us back to the noter.
The noter then sent an email to someone in Ankara (not sure if the tax head office or some other office/department) asking them to sort the issue.

It took a total of 4 days for them to assign 50-50 share of the car so that it could be sold.

We have since spoken to a few friends and this has been an issue for a number of years when two people are named on the ruhsat, which we were not aware of.

Our advice to anyone buying a vehicle which you both would drive is to have it only in one persons name.
I would agree with 10pin. One name only, but the drivers must be immediate family members. It is written on the ruhsat of an 'MA' car that only the owner and immediate family can drive it. Last year our Kasko company refused to pay out on a claim for our van, as it is registered to my wife and she had a foreign licence and been in the country more than 6 months. When I pointed out that I am her husband (We have different surnames), and had the right to drive it they conceded and paid out.
 

judgejules53

Julesworth
Motoring - Buying A Vehicle in Turkey
An update to this based on our personal experience.

We bought our car in 2009 and have just sold it.

The problem we ran into at the noter was that both myself and my wife were named on the ruhsat (which we were told to do so we could both drive the car), but there was no mention on the ruhsat as to what percentage of the vehicle we each owned.
The noter sent us to the tax office to sort the problem, the tax office sent us back to the noter.
The noter then sent an email to someone in Ankara (not sure if the tax head office or some other office/department) asking them to sort the issue.

It took a total of 4 days for them to assign 50-50 share of the car so that it could be sold.

We have since spoken to a few friends and this has been an issue for a number of years when two people are named on the ruhsat, which we were not aware of.

Our advice to anyone buying a vehicle which you both would drive is to have it only in one persons name.
I would also highly recommend getting indefinite Power Of Attorneys (POA) for any/all named owners of any property owned, movable or immovable, because for whatever reason they may not be able to go to the Notary you cannot do any transactions without them, and the whole process can be stressful enough at times. 😤
 

Latest Posts

Top Bottom