Midwives in Turkey?
This is a question to all you expats. Does such a thing as a midwife exist in Turkey? If not who delivers babies, gives antenatal care and postnatal care etc.? I ask this because I am a midwife in England and wondered what, if any job oportunities there are for me. Do all you expats need an English midwife (perhaps giving an independant midwifery service) or is the current care adequate? Just giving it some thought at the moment. Would be interested to hear your views.
 
Midwives in Turkey?
there are midwives in turkey..but turkish women prefer doctors...village women use the services of the Sa─člik Hoca..
Birth injury is common in rural areas as you can imagine...but even village women now prefer to birth in hospital... if they have insurance.
caesarian births are common...antenatal care is given by the doctor of choice..or at the Devlet hospitals.
postnatal care is nonexistant following a normal birth
Breast feeding is the norm...in all classes of women.
 

jellybean

Member
Midwives in Turkey?
Hi. I live in Fethiye and had my first baby over here in Nov 04. For the first few months i visited the hospital monthly, then towards the end it was fortnightly and then weekly. Each time i saw the pregnancy Doctor( sorry official name has slipped my mind)My baby became distressed and wanted freedom at 8 months so i had an emergency c/section this was done by the same Dr and her team. I was let out after 24 hours. I visited this Dr again a few days later but that was about it.Then you visit the childrens Dr.
There is not really a midwife service here most Turkish women will get help and advice from mother, aunties etc.
You may get the odd private job. There was times when i could have done with someone but it was not needed. If you can speak Turkish you may be able to get a job as an interpreter in an hospital, which would be great as you would know what the Dr means and what you were interpreting.
This i found hard as i found the interpreters didn't always understand what i was asking.
But i have to say the whole experience was great and i have no worries about having no2 here.
 
Midwives in Turkey?
Thanks for replys, quite interesting to hear how things are done in another country. A bit scary to hear that you are discharged 24hours after c/s, with hardly any followup care. or maybe we are a bit old fashioned in England!
 
Midwives in Turkey?
Hi, I am a non-practising midwife. At present working as a community nurse. Retiring early and hoping to move to Turkey in November. I think I am right in saying nursing is one of the jobs you are not allowed to do. You need to be a Turkish citizen and speak fluent Turkish. I would be interested in finding out what the 'rules' are in the private hospitals as you may be abe to work in those.
Mary
 

Lynda

In my dreams I'm dancing
Midwives in Turkey?
Just stay retired.......... the nursing service here is very diverse. excellence running alongside cringe worthy practice. I am retired communty nurse manager and had to have a number of ops here so speak from my own experience. There is efforts to modernise and I know of a link to nursing in Uk ( already had one international conference) but this will take time as does everything. To practice here as a foreigner is virtually impossible with or without the language & your citizenship.
 

lewismark

Just a member
Midwives in Turkey?
There is a web site, detailing which proffessions a foreigner is NOT allowed to do in Turkey, you can read all about it HERE
 

Mand

New Member
Midwives in Turkey?
Hi! I'm a Clinical Nurse Specialist for Neuro Oncology within the NHS and was seriously considering moving to Fethiye 2 years ago. I sent my CV to 2 private hospitals in Fethiye and was invited to attend for interviews whilst on holiday, but after careful consideration, decided to remain in the UK for a while longer. I was really interested to read that foreign nurses are not allowed to practice within Turkey, yet I didn't appear to have any problem getting to interview stage. Is this a new ruling? I can't imagine that a private hospital would allow a registered nurse to work illegally - or would they?!?!?!?!
I'd be interested to hear what you think. :30:
 
Midwives in Turkey?
i think they just have thier kids without the molleycodling from people who just hold thier hands turkey has not yet fallen for the tree hugging liberal nambsy pansy stuff yet
 
Midwives in Turkey?
Bryan Sargent said:
i think they just have thier kids without the molleycodling from people who just hold thier hands turkey has not yet fallen for the tree hugging liberal nambsy pansy stuff yet

Bryan, your remarks seem to imply that all midwives do is hold hands with women in labour. As a qualified nurse and midwife I feel a little insulted by these remarks. I can assure you that there is more to it than holding hands. A midwife cares for a women throughout pregnancy, childbirth and afterwards. There is nothing 'nambsy pansy' about it as I am sure most midwives and mothers will agree!
I am sure if you compare the morbidity rate of childbearing women in England to countries such as Turkey, England will be much lower, which reflects on the high standard of care women revieve in England.
If I have misunderstood you I apoligise, but I really think you should think about what you are writing.

Caroline
 

Lynda

In my dreams I'm dancing
Midwives in Turkey?
Well said Caroline, agree with all your comment. Except for the bit about little insulted... I feel a lot insulted both as a qualified nurse and a mother of 2, who except for the excellence of the midwife and doctors could have lost my son - who as some will have seen on my last avatar is a healthy attractive 29yr old..
Bryan if what was said was a joke, faecetiousness or a wind up.. then ayip - shame on you.
If it was a serious comment.. then thank God you do not have the babies or maybe you should, then you might get to know a little of what you are talking about.
 
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petenic

Member
Midwives in Turkey?
Well said Caroline and Lynda! I think midwives do a grand job - keep up the good work. Why some folk have to insist on being so rude I don't know.

Nicki
 
Midwives in Turkey?
I agree, Caroline and Lynda. Midwifery is a 24hr 7 day a week job. Caring for the Mother in the antenatal period and during the birth. During this time many potental problems can be picked up and treated. Following birth the mother and baby are monitored during the post natal period up to 28 days. I gave up midwifery due to the demands of the on call system. I enjoyed the ante natal parent craft classes and used to teach the aqua-natal classes in the local swimming pool. I have been told by some Turkish friends that Turkish ladies would not go swimming or eat ice cream when pregnant. I dont know if this is the norm or if village customs are different than from women who live in the cities. As for feeling insulted, yes so do I. I think perhaps some people writing on this site say things to provoke, perhaps even had a drink or too! Certainaly limited understanding of the role of a Midwife. (I have not meant to offend anyone.) Mother of 3 and a Qualified Nurse.
 

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