bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Gardening to me is an opportunity and a delight to work with nature and never against it.When l turn the soil over early in the season here in Akbuk,l always use the fork so not to injure the living creatures in the soil,and also if l see any surface living insects on the surface,l will never harm that insect,because of the job that insect does to control the pests that does damage to the plants.l am as strong believer if you work with nature,nature will work with you,and l have always believed that.

When l first moved in my house about 4 years ago here in Akbuk the soil was very poor.There was no texture to it and was very hard to the touch when dry and very sticky when went.This type of soil was hard clay,with no living organisms in it.So with a little patience and know how,l now have a more healthy garden with soil that is filled with living organisms.This allows the soil to breath and to stay healthy,feeding the nutrients to the plants.

Gardening doesn’t have to be expensive if you know what to do.The compost you need to improve the texture of the soil is from the kitchen waste[not cooked and no fats] Dig a hole one foot deep to one foot wide.throw in the waste and then throw on one inch of soil.Water the soil into the first layer and leave it.The next batch of waste you have to throw in the hole is the same method as the first,and water that one in again.Keep on doing this until you reach the top.tamp it down and throw on the top layer of soil tamp that down and water in.

Wait two seasons and you have a good quality type of soil that the plants will love.
This is the way l do it here in Akbuk.But in England when l was a professional gardener,l built my own compost bin,one for humus and the other was for leaf mould.never mix leaves with the other composted kitchen waste,because the leaf mould breaks down by fungi,where the compost breaks down with high active microbes that gives off a heat up to 150 degrees.
 
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EVELYNNE

evelynne
Lets Talk Gardening
bob, do you manage to grow any of the root vegatables in Akbuk, swede turnips etc and beetroot . I know on my site the caretaker 's wife grows herbs and onions but didn;t notice her growing the traditional root veg.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
bob, do you manage to grow any of the root vegatables in Akbuk, swede turnips etc and beetroot . I know on my site the caretaker 's wife grows herbs and onions but didn;t notice her growing the traditional root veg.

l know of a few local Turkish people that do grow the rooted vegetables here,only because there soil is more of a texture but deeper for the root vegetables to penetrate the soil for that tapered shape.
l cannot as yet,because of the soil is only one foot deep and then l hit very hard clay.But l am working on it,by collecting all the cow pats and ordering more soil for the garden.
During the autumn l will double dig to break up the sub soil that has caked hard and then throw in the cow pats.Throw over the surface soil and the new soil l willorder and then l will be in a good position to grow the rooted vegatables.

Also l have noticed the water here in Akbuk has a lot of sediments that can effect the plants growth.
l tested this theory out last year.one pot had the rain water l collected and the other had the tap water.There was a big difference in growth.l heard they mix it with some sea water,if that's the case then the water is contaminating the soil which effects the plants growth.
 

Guz1

Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Bob: I hope this thread won't be confined to gardens in Turkey because we tiled ours, but I'll be looking for advice about my garden here in Ireland.
 

Sunny Seasider

Life is so precious
Lets Talk Gardening
I love watching each season and in particular the nature that goes hand in hand with it, my favourite time has to be Spring when the birds are so very busy building their nests, this year we've had blue tits, blackbirds and collared doves nesting in our garden. They provided so much pleasure as we watched them fledge and have kept our bird feeders full for them to feast off. I mix suet and mealworms for the babies and the adults go mad for that. We have an all year evergreen low maintenance garden, but at this time of year it's also a blaze of colour with the baskets of bedding plants and pots, I have 4 glorious Senetti's out at the moment, and as we know the more we dead head the more flowers we enjoy. I also love Sweet Williams, for me when they are in flower, summer is here and they last for weeks. We have a resident hedgehog (Harry) he has his home behined our shed and I put tinned dog meat out for him, (my dog will only eat chicken tho), so he also gets a treat if Monty's left any. For the first time this year we had a go at growing our own potatoes (both earlies and late varieties), and with the help of Bob (Thank You Bob),he confirmed that we were doing right, the pleasure of digging up and eating freshly dug potatoes was delicious, now we're waiting for the late variety to be ready, lol, my mouth is watering now just thinking about that. I have always been interested in nature, and also how the moon and venus stay to-gether, well most of the time she kinda leaves him when he's on the wane. As the saying goes "Time and Tide wait for no man" and neither will nature, which makes us priviledged to be a part of this planet. Because we lead busy lives, I love it when out in Turkey sat on my balcony in the quiet of the night with the moon and stars and the peacefulness, and the tiny owls come and sit on the wall, it is sheer bliss.

:wow:
 
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bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Bob: I hope this thread won't be confined to gardens in Turkey because we tiled ours, but I'll be looking for advice about my garden here in Ireland.

No problem,ever thought of a water garden.
 

Guz1

Member
Lets Talk Gardening
I think, Bob, that we have enough water falling from the sky here without having to worry about tending it on the ground.

I'll just be looking for basic tips about the most effective weedkiller and minimum maintenance plants. (In my dreams I'm Alan Titchmarsh's bra-less sidekick but in reality I'm a boulder-holder wearing garden nightmare).

Will be off line for a few weeks so keep this thread going until I get back. Thanks for starting it.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
What a wonderful story you written there Sunny.Harry the hedgehog sounds as though he has got it made living in your garden.
We also feed the birds here,a bit different to the one's in England.They are so scrawny.So my wife took pity on them and now feeds them with all sorts of titbits and lote of water.They perch themselves on the wrought iron fencing panting away waiting and always on time for their dinner.
 

pineapple1

I Love Kleopatra Beach !
Lets Talk Gardening
Hi Bob i.ve had the back garden slabbed . But i need to make a little instant lawn 8ft x12ft For the kids { dogs } to piddle The corgi just wont go on the slabs . its heavy soil should i put a bit of top soil on it or dig in some sand / compost . Or what . with all this rain i can turf it . its 2 inches below the slab hieght now . Whats your opinion ? And is it to late now to seed it has the turf will be heavy for me to carry . Diane
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Greetings Diane,
l do apoligize for the delay,since l was at Altinkum sorting out my financial curcumstances with another bank.
This article is not my writing but from another source explaining how to lay a lawn.The best times to lay the seed is in the spring when the weather is cooler and a lot wetter.lt can be a hit and miss scenario during the summer if you decide to lay the seed,because of the fluctuating temperatures,which can have an effect on the grass.Sorry it's not my writing,l feel a bit knackered.

Here is the article from lawn and mower.
Laying Turf – a guide to using turf to create a lawn
Laying a lawn from turf is one of the most self-satisfying jobs that you can do as it is a fairly quick process and you get instant great looking results. The wonderous green ‘quilt’ on your garden unfolds before your very eyes. Laying turf is a job like most others - it pays to plan and prepare well, after that the final stages of laying turf should be pretty straight forward.

You should lay turf when the temperature isn’t too hot, early spring and Autumn are recommended as the turfs are less susceptible to the parching effects of the sun and there should be enough moisture in the soil to help the roots establish and develop downwards. When ordering turf be sure to have your ground preparation done before your turf arrives. This will ensure that your turf isn’t sitting around for extended periods before laying it as the turf condition and vigour will deteriorate the longer it is kept in storage.

Preparing the site for turf laying
Along with choosing good quality turves (see buying turf from turfing suppliers) - the key to laying a good lawn from turf is the preparation of the ground the turves are to be laid on. In brief summary preparing the soil involves

removing and burning weeds
removing bricks, stones and other objects that will inhibit root growth.
Skimming off any existing turf
Cultivating the soil to about a spades depth with an even surface, free of lumps / hollows
Testing soil type and taking appropriate action
It is definitely worth spending the time and effort here to ensure that you have a good foundation for siting your lawn on, for more information see preparing the soil for a lawn.

After your hard work (depending on what your lawn site was previously like) you are now ready to lay the turves. To lay turf start by marking out a lawn edge with a garden line string by driving two canes into the soil at each end of the lawn and securing the garden line to them. You will use this straight line as a guide to where the edge of your first line of turf should appear.

Turves tend to come in lengths of about 1m and vary in width from 1 to 2 feet. Lay your turves snugly together so that they ends actually overlap by ½ an inch so that the edge of each turf is slightly raised where the turves meet. This will encourage the turves to grow ‘together’ and also prevent any unwanted ‘gaps’ or holes appearing in the lawn. Work along the garden line until you have finished and then start the next row.

Stagger the alignment of turfs adjacent rows so that a continous join line does not appear across the whole lawn which will be far more noticeable than if the join only crosses one row. See the diagram below.

When laying turf it may be necessary to walk back over the turves that have already been laid. This can mess the turves up and cause compaction if done repeatedly so laying a plank across the turves and resting / walking on the plank can help distribute weight across the turves more evenly and prevent footprints, particularly in wet weather.

If any gaps are found after laying the lawn you can fill them with a top dressing mix, for more information see applying a top dressing to the lawn.
After you have finished laying the turf you need to ensure that it is in contact with the soil it is laid on so that the lawns roots can bond with and penetrate into the soil. You can use the reverse side of a spade to do this by stamping the turf, alteratively you can ‘walk’ the turf in by side-stepping a foots width at a time. Do not overdo the stamping of the turf as this can damage the grass.

That’s it, you have laid your even turf lawn and it should now successfully establish its root system in your well prepared soil. You should refrain from mowing your lawn until you can clearly see new growth from the turf, this lets the roots establish themselves before any stress. If periods of dry weather follow the date of laying your turf then you may need to water the new lawn if cracks start appearing.
 
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rosewall1

ex Bond Girl
Lets Talk Gardening
Hi Bob, so glad you are onto your gardening themes, I desperately need your advice. My grape vine which is about 6 years old, last year after pruning the previous years shoots back to 2 or 3 buds produced its first crop of grapes. Did the same this year and have very few grapes but the none productive side shoots have gone mad - should I prune them now or just wait until next year?
Next problem is I grew from seed some gourds, loads of male flowers, one or two female flowers but they die before opening. Help.
Finally I want to grow some potatoes but they will have to be in pots. What sort should I use, where do I get them and when should I plant them?
Sorry if I am taking up too much of your time.
 

kale

Member
Lets Talk Gardening
hi bob good your back one of our neighbours here in the uk has a wormary special worms i think i,m no gardener. but these are real interesting to watch ,hundreds of worms feed with kitchen waste ,tea bags, human hair,and lot of other things when its all gone through the system they end up with liquid manure which is then diluted . and you can actualy here them busy at work in this special bin
take care kale
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Hi Rosewalli,
l not feeling at all to well today to give out my views on gardening,but l did find a fantastic video,explaining the basics in pruning.
l have pruned many vines over the years and trained them as one main shoot to grow and then the six side shoots to grow into a fan shape,called a espatalier.[something like that]
Here is the link
Viddler.com - Grapevine pruning 2008 - Uploaded by Grapestompper
Are you sure it is the males that have died on the gourd plants,Normally you will find it is the female flower that wilts and dies,because of no polination.What l do is to grab the male flower and take some of the flower off,exposing the stigma and then shove it in the female plant,this will instantly pollinate the female.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Hello Kale.
Fascinating little creatures aren't they.lf you look closely how a worm eats,you will be amazed by the size of it's mouth.lt open up just like a snake dislocating it's jaws and takes a big morsel of waste in the gob and swallows it whole.
These worms are bramlings,the ideal worm to convert waste into good high quality compost as food for the plants.
Nature is wonderful recyling machine
 

kale

Member
Lets Talk Gardening
hi bob
yes bob iv,e watch with great interest i think the whole system cost about £100 they put the container (like a mini dust bin ) in the gararge for the winter .she also emties the vacum cleaner in it , when i last had alook she had loads of babies in the container .would be very interesting for schools to take this up a real interest for the chil dren cheers bob and mrs bob
 

rosewall1

ex Bond Girl
Lets Talk Gardening
Hi Bob, Sorry that you are not feeling well hope you will be better soon.
Thanks for the video, very informative, I have run it once but will sit and study it later. Some of my pruning was right but it has give me more info. Yes it is the female flowers on the gourds that die out before flowering.
When you feel better can I refer you to my potato query. Absolutely no rush.
It is wonderful having a gardener expert on this forum because one of the things I am having to learn is how to garden in Turkey, although the basic principles are as in the UK the weather and soil are so different.
Many thanks
Jill
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Hello Rosewall1,sorry for the delay.Here is my view on what is wrong with your flowers on the gourds.There are more male flowers then the females,which needs pollinating to produce the fruit that is behind the female flower to swell.lf they keep on dieing,then the most likely causes are the female hasn’t been pollinated and just dies the next say,due to no insects pollinating it for you.

To overcome that,you must do it yourself,by taking a male flower and rip of the petals to expose the stigma,then just firmly thrust it deep inside the female flower and just leave it there for a day.That should do the trick.


The best varieties to grow in a tub are the first and second earlies,because of the size from the main crop is a lot larger.The variety l used in my gardening days was Arren Pilot[l forgot the others]Always go for the creamy white textured flesh,since this will be the variety to look forward to a that will give you an incentive to carry on this method of growing once you have tasted the flesh.

1/My method in growing by pots is.Always use a fairly large container[remember the smaller the container,the smaller the tubers]Double your stock by cutting them in half with each half having two eyes or more,leave the exposed flesh to dry cake hard.

2/Now they have dried you are ready now to plant them.A 2 gallon container will do.Place the container where you want it with it standing on some crock as legs so the drainage will be effective.[1/4 inch from the ground will do]

3/Now you shove a few stones broken clay pots anything just to cover the drainage hole at the bottom.Then throw in some good quality compost mixed with soil,say a few inches deep[more compost then soil].

4/Lay the half cut tuber with the two eyes upright on the soil.Bury this tuber just a little not to expose the tuber but also just the eyes are barely covered.

5/This is when the fun starts.As the tuber starts growing,then is when you just keep on burying it until it reaches the top.Then you allow the plant to flourish on it’s own.No need for the burying anymore.

6/Potatoes will grow quicker in a restricted space then in open ground.You should get an average of 2 to 3 pds of potatoes if the plant is correctly nurtured.Always water it well and never let it dry out.Feed it with a tomato fertilizer[l did,and it worked wonders]or you can make your own fertilizer liquid,lt is easy

7/Once the leaves turn yellow.That’s the time to harvest your delicious earlies.
The reason for the burying as the plant grows is because this allows the main root to lengthen itself,this is the root that grows the little buds which forms into nice potatoes.
 
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Lets Talk Gardening
Double digging!

I take my hat off to you.

I have tried to grow parsnips, swedes and curly kale but with no success.

Last year I sowed them in very early spring. I will sow a few this autumn and see what happens.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Talk Gardening
Another joy from gardening is what you can get out of it without going down to the stores to buy those exspensive products that are advertised on the telly.Because in the end it does work out more exspensive in the end ,then if you bought the produce in the first place.

I’ll give you a few tips on how l used to do it.Never look at the weed as a useless plant,you’ll be surprised by the many weeds that are so beneficial.Lets take one for instance.

Plants that grow above ground thrive on nitrogen.An ideal food fertilizer for tomatoes.Here is how to make it.Get yourself a lot of stinging nettles,young fresh ones are more preferable,[non contaminated]and a large container.Once you have all the nettles you want, cut them up crush them[always wear gardening gloves]
Bung them in your container weighed down with a brick,before adding enough water to just cover the nettles.Leave the brew for at least a month or a little more,until it starts to smell.That smell is the fertilizer forming.

This is the bit that needs to be right,because if you don’t get it right,the plants your feeding the fertilizer to can die or produce so much growth without the fruit .
This brew is now ready to dilute to a 1 part of neat brew to every 10 parts of rain water[tap water optional] .Bottle it and there you have it,free fertilizer for those hungry plants of yours.

Want to know how to make stinging nettle soup,l tried it and it’s like a party of several bees exploding in your mouth [only joking]
 
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