bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Grow Food
I have grown many plants while l was a gardener in England and wondered if anyone would like to know a few things about gardening and how to grow your very own produce.
What would you like to grow that will benefit your family as well as financially.Would you like to grow Brussels ready in time for Christmas.This will provide you with fresh abundance of Brussels that is far more rewarding then buying from the shops.Picking your own fruit and veg to me is a rewarding time of year,because it makes one feel a sense of achievement has been harvest as well.

Or what about growing your own organic parsnips,or any member of the brassica family.
Or what about growing peas and the pods can be used later to make pea pod wine,which l did make.Best concoction to get merry,,l can tell ya!,,HIC!
 

Tess

Member
Lets Grow Food
Bob I admire anyone who grows their own food, it must be so satisfying sitting eating your meal knowing it was planted, nurtured and grown personally.
I always find if someone gives me home grown produce the taste is amazing.
My late Father had an allotment and grew and grew and grew the most amazing things - far far too much for himself and the neighbours all benefitted and enjoyed.
His reward was one lady in particular made him jam from his marrows and he loved it.
He grew, leeks, carrots, parsnips, celery, parsley, potatoes, cabbages, lettuces, you name it he had a go at it and with varying success. Ultimately even though some of the carrots etc were not the shop type shape they always tasted good.
In the short time between his retirement and untimely death it kept him busy.
My Father would have been short tempered and impatient, yet in his allotment it seemed to ease that personality and he seemed more even tempered and patient.
Sadly I did not inherit his love of growing, plants even struggle with me.
I would like to have healthy plants but sadly I am the worst ever.
If I ever get the bug to try and grow I would have to make do with pots as my front and back of house is a combination of blue circle and paving slabs. So not grow friendly.
However I do hear of success from pots. Maybe I will have a go sometime and try and lose my reputation of being far from 'green fingered'
Looking forward Bob to your subsequent posts on 'grow your own' - well done, good stuff.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Grow Food
You will be surprized Tess of what can be grown in a confined space.
But for some it can be difficult if most of their time is taken up working for a living.
But l am sure l can give you some tips of what to grow in pots on a patio
 

hijo

in my own clique
Lets Grow Food
..i have loads of packets of parsnip seeds (my fave veg) but been told there to difficult to grow here ..i was thinking possbly grow bags might do it ..:kitapoku:..any suggestions gratefully recieved
 

Tess

Member
Lets Grow Food
Hijo I am the least knowledgable person on growing but I recall my Dad always saying Parsnips always benefit from a touch of frost ??? maybe Bob could clarify that or someone who grows parsnips - agree with you on parsnips, love them.
 

kibris

Member
Lets Grow Food
I have a few friends and an older sister who seem to have the gardening touch but im afraid im hopeless --love to read about it though-bobs gardening posts are great and the mosquito repellent out of geranium leaves really works
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Grow Food
l always grew my parsnips in England and have always been successful.
But here can be difficult because of the climate.They do grow well with moderate atmospheric temperatures.And needs the soil to be watered during the growing season.This is what l find is difficult here,because the tap water here in Akbuk has minerals that do distort the growth and can kill the plant off.l have seen my plants leaves turn yellow and then died even though l watered them well.
l found out later by my own experiment,there was a lot of sediments in the water that will utilize the nutrients in the soil.

But if you live in an area where the tap water is fine then you should be able to grow the parsnips.
First prepare the ground during the winter months by digging out the large stones.Make sure the ground has been deeply dug since the parsnip likes the soil well drained and dug deeply for the root to penetrate.Never use manure just before planting since this will fork the roots.Use a manure patch for it to break up naturally and then scatter the compost evenly over the prepared ground.

Rake the area to a fine tilth when the soil is dry enough to do this.And then tie some string from end to end on sticks and stake into the ground.This will give you a guide for a perfect straight row

When late February comes,then sow the seeds in rows of three seeds in a group about 4inches from each other and one foot from each row.
Once the seeds start growing you will notice one of them will be stronger.Pick out the two weaker one's and then allow the strong one to grow.Always keep the plant waters but not left in standing water,they don't like it.And never start parsnips off in tubs,because once the parsnip seedlings root has been tampered with you will have very stunted roots when mature.

Keep it weed free from each row and never disturb the root while weeding since this will make the root grow in a weird way.
The parsnips will be ready to harvest in Autumn.

l cannot guarantee this will be successful in Turkey,because l never tried it here.But generally the rules apply to ..the right temperature with partial shade in hot climates.keep it out of the full med sun,this will burn the leaves.The right soil and cultivated properly,and the planting of seeds l mentioned and the nurturing while growing with the water without any of the sediments.Rain water is best
 
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juco

Member
Lets Grow Food
I used tubs this year, below is the results although the frost is now killing the lettuce off. I have already had one crop from the parsley and dried that for over winter.

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nanamo

Member
Lets Grow Food
My son and daughter-out-law planned a small allotment at the back of their very long garden this year. Everything they grew came up in abundance and they were thrilled but Bob, heres a question for you. When they came to dig up the potatoes which looked lovely and healthy from above ground they discovered millions of tiny little tatties. Apparently there were holes in the ground which were about 3 inches wide running right through and underneath the area. No signs of animal poo but definate tunnels. Any ideas what it it could be.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Grow Food
lt could be voles and moles.Lf you had lots of little tatties they could be eating the nobules before they started to swell leaving you with little ones on the main root.
l never had that problem while in England,but the signs are there that it is a small rodent
 
Lets Grow Food
Well, I'd love to be able to grow my own! Only trouble is we are only in Turkey 5 weeks per year and not due out now until next April, its very frustrating as we have a large plot of land just sitting there doing nothing. I've never grown my own before, but I am sure I could do it. It such a shame to see this land dormant that I have now offered it to Semahat (she looks after our security and villa gardens when we are not around) as she may be able to benefit herself, her family and our Turkish neighbours from home grown fruit and veg with just one proviso, that I may pinch some when we are in Turkey. I will be reading all your gardening tips with interest. I am taking my Auntie out next year, she has really green fingers, hopefully she will be able help dig a veg plot if Semahat hasn't already done it. Its great to read this kind of thread such a relief from all the usual moans and groans!
 

juco

Member
Lets Grow Food
Only trouble is we are only in Turkey 5 weeks per year and not due out now until next April,

Then go for trees and vines, once established they need very little maintenance.
Grapes,Oranges,Figs,Lemons, Pomegranates,Apples.
 
Lets Grow Food
Yep, we have the figs and the pomegranates (tried one late September - eeeuck! Don't think it was ripe enough - apparently there was some fued in Uzumlu many years ago about apple trees - unfortunately I cannot remember what it was about now, sorry as it would have been interesting reading - I am sure Saoirse would know all about it. Will definitely be planting orange and lemon trees. In a garden nearby I saw the hugest lemons I have ever seen! Can wait to get back and hire a rotovator, if that's what they are called!
 

ChrisBobs

Member
Lets Grow Food
So Bob and Juco
we have a patch dug up and manured, then the dog dug it up again just to be sure :)

So now that we have had rain all is ready for the planting of ....what?
Brussels Sprouts? Lettuce? ( saw seedlings in the market)
What do you recommend - virtually frost free slight slope and on the hill, drains fast, and most sunshine.
Parsley and roka was one thought too.
 
Lets Grow Food
Bob, please start a regular column here. I'm just about to start square foot gardening on my roof, would love to know what's the right thing to plant and any tips for growing stuff in Mugla climate ...

Neil
 

juco

Member
Lets Grow Food
Bob, please start a regular column here.

I think that would be a great idea, maybe starting a new thread for each month.
Bob could, at the beginning of each month offer suggestions on what to plant, how to plant it and general tips for the rest of that month.
Then answer the flood of questions that come in regarding to that month.

The only thing I would suggest Bob is that as many are going to be `beginners`the main objective would be to get a result as in ` i planted seed and I got plants` At this early stage if you get too technical then it could put many off.

I have grown stuff in the uk for many years and have a tendency to ignore all the techy stuff and just do my own thing, I dont ever bother with fertilizers or feed the plants and I always get results. Once you get the basics a lot just falls into place.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Lets Grow Food
I have found here in Turkey can be limited to what l used to grow in England because of the climate dictates to me what l should not grow.And the hot climates can make the nutrients in the soil sparse.
But the humble tomato is a plant that can tolerate hot climates.So are leafy green vegetables,but specific varieties,like the cucumber,zucchini,shallots,onions,mustard green,chillies,squashes,and also you can grow the banana ‘s,grapes and generally what Juco mentioned

I think that would be a great idea, maybe starting a new thread for each month.
Bob could, at the beginning of each month offer suggestions on what to plant, how to plant it and general tips for the rest of that month.
Then answer the flood of questions that come in regarding to that month.

The only thing I would suggest Bob is that as many are going to be `beginners`the main objective would be to get a result as in ` i planted seed and I got plants` At this early stage if you get too technical then it could put many off.

I have grown stuff in the uk for many years and have a tendency to ignore all the techy stuff and just do my own thing, I dont ever bother with fertilizers or feed the plants and I always get results. Once you get the basics a lot just falls into place.

l think that is a brillant idea.l love to help people along the way in the gardening world,because of what benefits it can reap.lt is a stress relief and educational towards the enviourment.lt gives us a more incite to what nature is and what it is all about.

l'll start the columm on the 1st of every month.December is the time for preparing for the next year.l always munured my garden at that time and dug the garden over for the frost to break the soil and exspose any pests and diseases for the frost to kill and wildlife to have a feast.
But l have to point out that my gardening day's were in England.Which is different to growing here in Southern Turkey
 
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