zozatky

Member
Less we Forget
The average age of the military man is 19 years. He is a short haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, just old enough to buy a beer, but old enough to die for his country. He has never collected unemployment either. He's a recent Comprehensive School graduate; he was probably an average student, pursued some form of sport activities, drives a ten year old jalopy, and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left, or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away. He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working or fighting from before dawn to well after dusk. He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less time in the dark. He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade launcher and use either one effectively if he must. He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional. He can march until he is told to stop, or stop until he is told to march. He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity. He is self-sufficient. He has two sets of fatigues: he washes one and wears the other. He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry. He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle. He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes, and fix his own hurts. If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you; if you are hungry, his food. He'll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low. He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands. He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job. He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay, and still find ironic humor in it all. He has seen more suffering and death than he should have in his short lifetime. He has wept in public and in private, for friends who have fallen in combat and is unashamed. He feels every note of the National Anthem vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to 'square-away' those around him who haven't bothered to stand, remove their hat, or even stop talking. In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful. Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great- grandfather, he is paying the price for our freedom. Beardless or not, he is not a boy. He is the BRITISH Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years. He has asked nothing in return, except our friendship and understanding. Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his blood. And now we even have women over there in danger, doing their part in this tradition of going to War when our nation calls us to do so. Prayer 'Lord, hold our troops in your loving hands.Protect them as they protect us.Bless them and their families for the selfless actsthey perform for us in our time of need. Amen.' When you receive this, please stop for a moment and say a prayer for our ground troops in Afghanistan, sailors on ships, and airmen in the air, and for those in Iraq . Of all the gifts you could give a British Soldier, Sailor,or Airman, prayer is the very best one
 

maggie

Member
Less we Forget
I must say Im quite touched by this post.

My grandson of just 16 joins the Army in September.

This really brings things home.
Hugs Maggie xxxx
 
Less we Forget
Well, that guy sounds like he'll go far. Me, I was a below average school leaver who couldn't get a job. Most of my mates were about the same and we were all committed to doing as little as possible for our pay. In action we kept our heads down until ordered to do otherwise. We were typical, and would be today.
 

Alan Fidler

Ceteris paribus
Less we Forget
As an ex serviceman who joined the Army as a boy soldier of 16 years of age, i identify myself with your post Zozatky, and there's so much truth in it, i commend your words.
Well done.

Alan.:3:
 
Less we Forget
"....the BRITISH Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years."

Whoever substituted "British" for the original "American" should perhaps have changed the 200 years to a more accurate number.
 
Less we Forget
Well said Alan! My membership was `56 - `79, it`s a pretty exclusive club we joined and you never forgot the rules. The Harry Patch funeral ceremony, together with the esprit de corps shown by the residents of Wootton Bassett must be quite moving to the guys currently serving.

They are an exceptional bunch of men and women who represent our country.
 

Alan Fidler

Ceteris paribus
Less we Forget
Well said Ian..

The Harry Patch funeral ceremony, together with the esprit de corps shown by the residents of Wootton Bassett must be quite moving to the guys currently serving.
To me too.. it still moves me, as does remembrance day every year....
Me, 76 - 84, RE.

Alan.
 
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zozatky

Member
Less we Forget
Same here 1970- 1979 Air Despatch.

"....the BRITISH Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years."

Whoever substituted "British" for the original "American" should perhaps have changed the 200 years to a more accurate number.

They should have changed the years to over 900 ! 1066 or there abouts The Battle of Hastings .Was the last time Briton was invaded.

i thought i was random!!! ahah love it!

Not shure what you mean..???
 
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KKOB

Completely Chillaxed
Less we Forget
Here's one of the links to the original American version.

The Military Man

It's believed to have been written at around the time of the Vietnam war and formed the background to Paul Hardcastle's hit '19' in May 1985.
 
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Less we Forget
Better change the average age too. It must be about 25 or more in a professional army. Come to think of it, there is very little truth in the whole thing.
 

zozatky

Member
Less we Forget
Better change the average age too. It must be about 25 or more in a professional army. Come to think of it, there is very little truth in the whole thing.

Thats your opinion I guess you are not from our shores. Were did you see active service ?
 

zozatky

Member
Less we Forget
Ok were or what lines were you at or outfit?



hate to say it but he was pretty spot on. A most random post (Less we forget - hilarious miss spelling - should be included in that biblical post)
As i have said in previous posts i did not know was in a classroom doing exams for English lit if thats the case Peregrine you have a lot of post to correct for Grammer Spelling & punctuation. Im sorry but we didnt all benefit from a good education. I also suffer from Dyslexia which i have tried hard to overcome..!!
 
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Avebob

Member
Less we Forget
For goodness sake stop being so petty, can't someone have honest feelings about something without being 'got at'.

A very thought provoking post zozatky, should have added, then they have to come back home and try to adjust, not easy would have thought.

Sorry to all if I have made a spelling mistake, bad grammar etc. but I think perhaps if all that's what you have to worry about, get a life, read, listen, and learn !

without prejudice
Avebob
:crazy:
 

Alan Fidler

Ceteris paribus
Less we Forget
Well said Avebob, too many threads go this way, it's disappointing and only leads to a loss of interest...
heaven knows why posts have to go off at a tangent, discontent and sarcastic comments ensue.. with people winding one another up, it's petty and needless.
Rant over, I'm going to lay down and chill, suggest others might consider doing the same.

Alan.
 

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