immac

Senior Member Has-Been
Home Help Service
I am not involved in this, but was asked for an opinion.

My Turkish neighbour and her friend, Graduate Social Workers, asked me about the idea of setting up a Home Help service for foreigners. Based on what they have seen in UK and USA, it would offer a menu of services to support ex-pats in their own homes. Steering clear of nursing/health care provision which would involve licencing issues, they would offer a range from cleaning and shopping, to personal care and support.

It might be used by someone recovering from medical condition/operation, to those who need help washing, dressing, getting in and out of bed because of age or capacity. Elderly couple, or individual, might call on them for specific tasks to enable them to stay in their Turkish home.

What do you think? What services might be useful?

Ian
 

Chris295

Member
Home Help Service
I'm sure that would be very successful, quite a lot of people reluctantly repatriate themselves because they are finding those sort of activities harder and harder to do themselves. Good luck to them.
 

SLEEPY

Member
Home Help Service
I also know a Turkish friend who is looking for such assistance and is finding it very difficult to find someone suitable.
 
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immac

Senior Member Has-Been
Home Help Service
These last two have surprised me. But they reflect a conversation I was having with a Turkish friend this morning, he was saying that my view of Turkish families is out of date, and they are often not able/willing to take care of parents. The days of younger generation caring for older generation is melting away.

It strikes me that the market is wide-open for this idea.

Ian
 

TLF Admin

Administrator
Home Help Service
The same thing is happening in other eastern societies too where the elders were once valued sadly seen as a burden now. Turkey is not unique in eroding family ties.

Once the large extended closely knit families were the norm, the younger generation are now too busy with virtual social networks instead of real families, unfortunately this is the result of modernity.
 

Kanga

Member
Home Help Service
The same thing is happening in other eastern societies too where the elders were once valued sadly seen as a burden now. Turkey is not unique in eroding family ties.

Once the large extended closely knit families were the norm, the younger generation are now too busy with virtual social networks instead of real families, unfortunately this is the result of modernity.
It's more likely that the daughters/sisters etc are now expected to earn a wage to support the household as well as doing most of the housework etc, so have less time to be carers for their elders. I doubt that the men of the household are offering to do it.
Women in their 40/50's in particular have become the 'sandwich generation' in every society, expected to look after elders as well as care for children.
You can't just assume that everyone prefers to be online. People are living longer and women are having children later in life. something has to give.
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Home Help Service
These last two have surprised me. But they reflect a conversation I was having with a Turkish friend this morning, he was saying that my view of Turkish families is out of date, and they are often not able/willing to take care of parents. The days of younger generation caring for older generation is melting away.

It strikes me that the market is wide-open for this idea.

Ian
In this case the son works in healthcare and the daughter's job often take her out of the country. What to do yani?
 

enoch

Member
Home Help Service
It's more likely that the daughters/sisters etc are now expected to earn a wage to support the household as well as doing most of the housework etc, so have less time to be carers for their elders. I doubt that the men of the household are offering to do it.
Women in their 40/50's in particular have become the 'sandwich generation' in every society, expected to look after elders as well as care for children.
You can't just assume that everyone prefers to be online. People are living longer and women are having children later in life. something has to give.
we have noticed a change over the years, the yunger men are starting to do more around the house. When we first came some of the neighbours used to shout out are you hen pecked. And my answer was no but your lazy.
 

immac

Senior Member Has-Been
Home Help Service
In this case the son works in healthcare and the daughter's job often take her out of the country. What to do yani?
Smaller families and greater mobility to follow the work.

My mother moved to South Shropshire 40 years ago. She met pensioners who had never been outside the county, and rarely travelled out of their village to the big town (Ludlow). As an aside, she also found some very old Shropshire women had all their teeth removed as a wedding preparation (present?), so as to avoid expense to the husband in the future.

Perhaps Turkey is going through what UK experienced after WW1.

Ian
 

Andybutt

Member
Home Help Service
My wife is already planning to refit the apartment below the villa for her mum when the time comes, so no change here. She did grow up in the south East, I think still more traditional in that part of Turkey.
 

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