hachris

Member
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
We are going to our house in Yalikavak first time. It has a large plot – about 800 sqm, but not a garden YET. We would like to transform the plot (slowly ;-)) into a garden starting while we are in Yalikavak in September. The plot is flat, no trees only a few bushes along the fence and lots of weeds. We want to have “some” grass in the middle and trees and bushes and flowers like a green belt along the fence. We need some advice on where to start - we know it takes years to really come to something you can call a garden. To begin with we would try to plant some trees and bushes so that they can settle down during the winter and start to grow.

Does anyone have experience with garden shops around Yalikavak/Bodrum to buy the plants? I know there are lots of them, but we would like to find someplace where they speak English and are reliable, our garden-project will take years and we would like to have somebody to talk to.

Another thing is buying soil for the garden – we need a lot, good and not too expensive. Any suggestions?

We don’t want to engage a gardening company and let them do everything – one reason is the money, we can’t do this in one go, another reason is we want to be a part of it. We have gardening experience from European countries, but not from the ”hot ones”.

We would like the garden to be also green, at least partly, during the winter. Any suggestions for trees or bushes which don’t need too much ongoing care and pruning and grow a bit fast ;-)? Something like “Mediterranean trees and bushes for dummies”… We have got 2 books on Mediterranean gardening but we don’t have a local knowledge.

:Flower:
HanaC
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
l have pasted a few of my gardening threads that maybe will benefit you.lf you do use grass to lay,then make sure it is wide bladed grass that is similar to rye grass.This will produce more of the food through photosynthesis then the narrow type of grass and can tolerate the dryer conditions better.There is a lot to know,before you even start.Always think of plants that can withstand drought conditions.
Keep a corner of the garden as a compost area as well,by digging a pit for the use of throwing in the biodegradable materials.
l have a thread about making compost.Also they sell bags of the stuff in markets on these tractors


http://www.turkishliving.com/forums/gardening/23844-my-little-garden.html

http://www.turkishliving.com/forums/gardening/26674-lets-talk-gardening.html

http://www.turkishliving.com/forums/gardening/23829-mediterranean-roof-garden.html

Bougainvillea
 

hachris

Member
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
I have looked at Forum’s photo gallery to spy on the members’ gardens but I have not found many pictures… But: Bob I have seen there a picture of your beautiful lemon tree, we must get at least one in our garden! I have read that lemon trees are difficult because they inclined to get different diseases – can you, please tell me what sort of lemon tree you have? It looks very healthy!

I will read all the other recommended threads on gardening, but I hope that somebody “gardening around Yalikavak/Bodrum” can give us some advice on plant-shops (where to buy/not to buy) and where to get the soil.

Thanks HanaC
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
I have looked at Forum’s photo gallery to spy on the members’ gardens but I have not found many pictures… But: Bob I have seen there a picture of your beautiful lemon tree, we must get at least one in our garden! I have read that lemon trees are difficult because they inclined to get different diseases – can you, please tell me what sort of lemon tree you have? It looks very healthy!

I will read all the other recommended threads on gardening, but I hope that somebody “gardening around Yalikavak/Bodrum” can give us some advice on plant-shops (where to buy/not to buy) and where to get the soil.

Thanks HanaC

lt is just an ordinary lemon tree you see all over the med.

What makes a tree healthy is by planting it properly in the first place, and as it continues to grow,take off the bottom side shoots of the main trunk.

Always stake the new plant,since this will stop the wind rock from happening that will disturb the roots from trying anchor itself in the soil.lt roughly takes about 2 years for the new roots to anchor itself in the soil and then you can take out the stake.

Always make a circular ridge of soil around the tree during the dry season and water it with rain water or bottled water.Save as much rain water during the rainy season for this purpose,lt does benefit the plant more then using tap water.

Planting a lemon tree is easy.Dig a hole so deep that the roots will be covered easily with the top ridge of soil.Bung in s mixture of broken down rotted biodegradable compost with a mixture of good soil and sand.l always throw in a sponge at the bottom of the hole to retain the water longer.The sponge does eventually breaks down.Loosen the lemon tree root ball by teasing it with an implement and your fingers,shove the root ball on top of the rotted debris at the bottom of the hole and then bang in the solid wooden stake to tie up later.

Fill the hole is sections.by filling in half and then tamp it down with your heel of the boot,shove in a little phostrogen or any type of food plant,evenly around the hole [a couple of teaspoons only]fill in the remainder of the soil until you reach the top,tamp that down and rake evenly with no root showing.

Make sure the top soil is slightly sloping towards the tree and not away from the tree,because this will stop the water from running away from the plant,which drain vital nutrients away from the plant.

My lemon tree is 4 years old and l prune it every year so it produces a well shaped tree and also an abundance of nice juicy lemons for me early in the year every year now.
 
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babsgood

Deemon in disguise
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
there is a very good garden centre in Derekoy, the guy also stands the market in Turgutreis on a Saturday, he has some very well established plants as well as 'babies'

we got our topsoil from the side of the road on the Kadikalesi to Turgutreis road, but you can also get it on the road into Bodrum, you will see great mounds of 'Toprak' just tell them how much you need and negotiate a price, I think we paid 100 TL for 20 tons delivered last summer.

as you are on the Bodrum peninsula it would make sense to have mandarin trees although their fruit is ready December /January so it would only be worthwhile if you will be here then to appreciate them, and of course there are always olive trees.

I suggest going to a garden centre, picking out what you like and giving it a go, what have you got to lose?
 

gren

Member
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
Don't overdo the size of your grass area-you will regret it!

Instead of laying a lawn (prepare ground/grass seeds/fertilizer/topsoil/compost/lots of work.....) lay some TURF!!!! I wish I had!

The lawn will need LOTS of water ALL summer.

Plant some Orlandears as wind breaks - they grow quickly and don't need much care..grape vines are very easy too...think about laying stonework (kayrak) with holes for the odd tree.
 

ChrisBobs

Member
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
Why plant lawn or grass - ie why not plan for a low water use garden! And while you are at it put some rain butts / water catchment tanks in as a buffer aginst wells going dry and the mains water...( er whats that?)
Yes have a patch of lawn to loll on, but green swards can also be got by planting tough Lippia ground cover, or the succulent Carpobrotus , and other similar.
I was actually caught by your statement ' We would like the garden to be also green, at least partly, during the winter. '
Green in winter is easy! After this rain the grass is already on the way up in the warmth of the soil, and the trees and bushes have revived.
To start with - reverse your idea of what is the dormant season - it really is summer- when things hunker down to survive the heat and dry- just look at the natural / maquis hillsides.
To sketch out your garden framework- decide where you want decidous trees and bushes first - to get winter sun and summer shade. Where the evergreens can shelter you and your garden from the winter NW winds. Go for the citrus , You are probably not in a frost hollow.
Buy a couple of pomegranates - ornamental and edible autumn fruits, deciduous, and lovely bright flowers for spring...and they are so tough you can move them any time. (my self sown one proved that!)
And if you want to brighten up your first spring - go out and get BULBS in now- throw some iris, freiasas, daffodils, tulips, wild garlic in by the handfuls . You can always move them before next autumn if they are not quite in the right spot.
Garden centres vary- first wander around and look at what is common to many local gardens- they work!
Enjoy!
 
Gardening in Yalikavak – some advice needed
Hi HaChris,

You don't say where your house is in Yalikavak. Ours is out in Geris Alti on the headland beside Bluewater Bay. We are very exposed to the strong winds you find practically all over Yalikavak. This is something you should consider when planning your garden. We planted some conifers as a hedge - they have grown very well - about one metre per year - and are easy to look after. On the other side we have oleanders - again no problem. We planted them in early spring last year and they have already established themselves very well. They are growing quickly and producing lots of flowers.
I particularly wanted bougainvilleas but they are more difficult. We have now discovered that it is best to buy the absolutely standard purple version with small leaves. The more cultivated coloured ones with the bigger leaves and sometimes double blossoms suffer more from the wind. Also bougainvilleas seem to need a couple of years to establish themselves - at least that has been our experience, so don't despair!
Our biggest problem is the lemon tree. From the start the gardener who was planting the site said it would never grow in the wind. Well it's growing but that's about all. Sometimes a few blossoms appear and they smell so good, but as soon as the fruits form, they just drop off. I have treated the tree with insecticide I got in Yalikavak since the leaves were curling but to no avail. Bob, if you have any solutions, I would be extremely grateful.
Like Gren, I say, do rethink the grass idea. Grass needs a lot of water and care. We only have a very small "lawn" and that is sufficient.
Before I went to the garden centres, I had a good look around the countryside to see what was growing wild and would therefore most likely do well in our garden. Except for the lemon tree, we have been quite successful.
Our olive tree is growing very quickly - I always believed they took ages to grow - and my husband is now cultivating a little wild olive we found in the stony headland in front of the house. We had a lot of fun planning and planting the garden and hope that you enjoy it just as much.
 
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