tintagel

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
I spotted this info about new Turkish Renting regulations & obligations which may be of interest to some members.

Blooming heck! they aren't making it any easier to invest there............

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR PROPERTY OWNERS

Summary of New Regulations for the Daily rental of houses, villas & apartments.

After the terrorist attacks in Istanbul, the Ministry of Internal Affairs has changed the regulations.

Summary of changes for daily weekly rental properties:

1- The Owner of the property must apply to Police or Jandarma & register the property, as a rental property.

2- After registration, you will be given a password.

3- You will have to buy a dedicated computer program & install it in your computer. The cost of program will be approx, 300 tl per property.

4- After you've installed the program, you have to send the list of people staying in the property between the hours of 24.00 -02.00, to the authorities every day.

5- You must send a (blank) list, even when there is nobody staying in the property on that day.

6- At the end of the season you can apply to Police, Jandarma to suspend your account until the next season.

Attention

If you start renting your Property on daily/weekly basis before applying to the Jandarma, you will be liable to Fines, starting at 10,000 tl.

If you don't send your guest list for one day (even when there is nobody in the property) the fine is 5,000 tl.

If anybody stays as a guest in your property and you don't inform the authority's & don't send the list daily to the them, you will be fined again.

Police will send your accommodation lists to tax office, you have to be careful to keep all documents, receipts for each entry and pay the tax. It's not clear yet if they will tax you under a 'simple tax declaration', or ask an accountant to register you as a business.

These new rules do Not apply to, Long term rental contracts, only short stays.
 
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stuart

stuart
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Good as far as am concerned. not much different from what hotels already have to do..
If it had been in place a couple of years ago in Ovacik near Fethiye might have stopped a particularly nasty spate of burglaries when the crooks rented a villa they operated from. the more security the better these days. imo.
 

teosgirl

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Good as far as am concerned. not much different from what hotels already have to do..
If it had been in place a couple of years ago in Ovacik near Fethiye might have stopped a particularly nasty spate of burglaries when the crooks rented a villa they operated from. the more security the better these days. imo.


If these 'security measures' are so good, why does Turkey continue to have such terrible terror attacks. Which terror attack was prevented (or burglary) because of such regulations?
I work in a hotel in the UK and we don't even ask to see ID, let alone hand any information to the police.

There should be freedom within a country without the governments police force being able to spy on people every minute.
This is just another excuse to do just that...I don't mind paying tax for money earned but this information is surely against peoples privacy rights.

Charlotte
 

Kanga

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Is this perhaps to do with the airbnb system of short term lettings where people are not declaring income and not paying tax?

From a security perspective, surely the police need to know where to go urgently if there's a serious security incident.

Life has changed for everyone. I think this is part of a general discouraging of short term bolt-holes but I would be very uncomfortable about installing a prog on my personal computer.
 

immac

Senior Member Has-Been
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Despite all the high minded reasons given, which may be an excuse to act, I think this is mainly down to making sure they collect as much tax as possible.

Ian
 

Kingfisher

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
I have no issue to showing ID at check-in at hotels. It used to becompulsory in UK and stil is in France and Germany. I don't know why it is no longer obligatory in the UK?
 
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Despite all the high minded reasons given, which may be an excuse to act, I think this is mainly down to making sure they collect as much tax as possible.

Ian
Surely nobody is suggesting that expat landlords who are renting their properties out for often £1,000 a week and more aren't paying taxes! I am sure this will just be a small admin issue for them and they will continue to pay their taxes to the authorities.
 

teosgirl

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
I have no issue to showing ID at check-in at hotels. It used to becompulsory in UK and stil is in France and Germany. I don't know why it is no longer obligatory in the UK?

I have no idea, I didn't even know it used to be compulsory in the UK. Are you certain it's still compulsory in France and Germany and not just part of the old system protocol?
All I know is that nowadays we simply take a name for the reservation but never ask to see ID.

Charlotte.
 

tintagel

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
I have no idea, I didn't even know it used to be compulsory in the UK. Are you certain it's still compulsory in France and Germany and not just part of the old system protocol?
All I know is that nowadays we simply take a name for the reservation but never ask to see ID.

Charlotte.

Hi Charlotte, my own recent experience of booking a hotel room in England is that; Home address, Full name, Contact numbers are requested on initial booking. On arrival, payment in full &/or Credit card details are required for hotel payments & services.

I would add that I have no problem with an accommodation provider (Hotel, B&b etc) securing identity checks.

To my knowledge this information/registration is still required across the EU & in Turkey.

https://www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/keeping-guest-register-your-tourist-accommodation-business
 

teosgirl

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Hi Charlotte, my own recent experience of booking a hotel room in England is that; Home address, Full name, Contact numbers are requested on initial booking. On arrival, payment in full &/or Credit card details are required for hotel payments & services.

I would add that I have no problem with an accommodation provider (Hotel, B&b etc) securing identity checks.

To my knowledge this information/registration is still required across the EU & in Turkey.

https://www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/keeping-guest-register-your-tourist-accommodation-business



I can assure you it's not law.
I work as a hotel receptionist and have also recently stayed in a novotel in London.
A guest can pay for the room via cash on arrival, does not need to provide any form of address (though you will be asked) and will not be asked for any ID during check in.
We often take reservations from Europeans and rarely get an address from them. If they've paid via Booking.com or some other provider then we never see the credit card details anyway.
When I checked in at the novotel I wasn't asked to provide any ID and didn't produce a credit card *they didn't even do a preauth* so basically I checked in with just my name.

I still fail to see how knowing this stuff helps with security. I don't know of any terrorists who have been caught because a hotel passed their check-in personal details to the local police.

Terrorists and murderers always provide genuine information I'm sure.


Charlotte
 

Kingfisher

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
It was a while ago that I worked at reception in a hotel in the UK and in those days you had to fill in a form (little beige card) with details on all guests which the police could ask for when they wanted.

In France ID is only required from non-French citizens, I have always been asked for my passport in Germany and Italy but don't know if it is compulsory or just normal practice.

It doesn't really bother me whether or not it is useful as an anti-crime measure, but I don't find it intrusive.

In Turkey the information is sent every evening to the Jandarma via special software issued to hotels and pansyions. Slightly more intrusive but I have seen people in the UK being asked for their driving licence to buy a can of beer!
 

teosgirl

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
It was a while ago that I worked at reception in a hotel in the UK and in those days you had to fill in a form (little beige card) with details on all guests which the police could ask for when they wanted.

In France ID is only required from non-French citizens, I have always been asked for my passport in Germany and Italy but don't know if it is compulsory or just normal practice.

It doesn't really bother me whether or not it is useful as an anti-crime measure, but I don't find it intrusive.

In Turkey the information is sent every evening to the Jandarma via special software issued to hotels and pansyions. Slightly more intrusive but I have seen people in the UK being asked for their driving licence to buy a can of beer!

Yes, in Turkey it is the law to send that information to the police every day.

In the UK it is not law to send any information anywhere, nor confirm the identity of a guest.


Charlotte
 

eliza

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
It is an unpleasant fact of modern life that security checks and knowing where people are is increasingly important. When I went to live in Germany many years ago you already had to register as living in a particular area at the local residency office, and that is for permanent residents. Here in the UK we have the census system. Checks on temporary residents are even more important, I would think ...
 

Kingfisher

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Seems as if you can make up your own rules in the UK.

"You must be able to show photo identification (a driver's licence, passport or national ID card) or the credit or debit card used to make your booking if requested by Travelodge at any time. If you are unable to produce this to the satisfaction of the hotel we may terminate your booking without refund."

https://www.travelodge.co.uk/terms-conditions#makingabooking

"At various times, we will be obliged to ask you, as an Accor S.A. customer, for information about you and/or members of your family, such as:
Contact details (for example, last name, first name, telephone number, email)
Personal information (for example, date of birth, nationality)
Information relating to your children (for example, first name, date of birth, age)
Your credit card number (for transaction and reservation purposes)
Your membership number for the AccorHotels loyalty program or another partner program (for example, the airline loyalty program)
Your arrival and departure dates
Your preferences and interests (for example, smoking or non-smoking room, preferred floor, type of bedding, type of newspapers/magazines, sports, cultural interests)
Your questions/comments, during or following a stay in one of our establishments."

Novotel: information on security and confidentiality

(Love the way Accor hotels are "obliged" to ask you about your bedding and cultural interests!!)
 

teosgirl

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
It is an unpleasant fact of modern life that security checks and knowing where people are is increasingly important. When I went to live in Germany many years ago you already had to register as living in a particular area at the local residency office, and that is for permanent residents. Here in the UK we have the census system. Checks on temporary residents are even more important, I would think ...

Yes I understand that but this new law about holiday rentals and having to give police information daily is a bit extreme. For example, in Turkey, I can go and stay at a friends house across the country for a month and no one needs to know. What's the difference?

If you say, well this rule is for foreigners, it is not. I can come into Turkey (and therefore the border police will know about me) and I can still go and stay at a friends house. OR I can bring a friend to Turkey and stay in my own house. No one needs to know in that instance. I can buy a camper van and park it by the beach (which happens frequently in Turkey) and no one needs to be informed. I can also sleep in the back of my pickup in any other town or city (also happens frequently in the summer in Turkey) and again, no one needs to be told or informed. A georgian person can cross the border by simply showing their ID card and can go and visit anyone he wishes. In fact, the Reina Istanbul killer was caught whilst staying at his friends house in Esenyurt.....no information passed to police under these new security measures would have changed that situation.

It's just another way of claiming tax (which I'm not against) but also spying, which I am against in Turkey because I've personally seen how the government abuses this power.

Charlotte
 

teosgirl

Member
Foreign landlords, tax obligations.
Seems as if you can make up your own rules in the UK.

"You must be able to show photo identification (a driver's licence, passport or national ID card) or the credit or debit card used to make your booking if requested by Travelodge at any time. If you are unable to produce this to the satisfaction of the hotel we may terminate your booking without refund."

https://www.travelodge.co.uk/terms-conditions#makingabooking

"At various times, we will be obliged to ask you, as an Accor S.A. customer, for information about you and/or members of your family, such as:
Contact details (for example, last name, first name, telephone number, email)
Personal information (for example, date of birth, nationality)
Information relating to your children (for example, first name, date of birth, age)
Your credit card number (for transaction and reservation purposes)
Your membership number for the AccorHotels loyalty program or another partner program (for example, the airline loyalty program)
Your arrival and departure dates
Your preferences and interests (for example, smoking or non-smoking room, preferred floor, type of bedding, type of newspapers/magazines, sports, cultural interests)
Your questions/comments, during or following a stay in one of our establishments."

Novotel: information on security and confidentiality

(Love the way Accor hotels are "obliged" to ask you about your bedding and cultural interests!!)


All I can say is as a hotel receptionist, the only thing I need is a name and the cash. I don't have to check identity and Novotel didn't ask me to provide anything other than my name.

I've also just found this - name and nationality is the only information we're obliged to keep by law (which we do, on a computerised booking chart)

https://dip9shwvohtcn.cloudfront.ne...ide-UK-Health-and-Safety-Regulation-Chart.pdf


Our lax laws in the UK are possibly why illegal immigrants manage to be employed all over the place.



Charlotte
 

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