bickern

Member
First time in England, a judge with a headscarf
For the first time in England, a judge with a headscarf was appointed. Raffia Arshad, 40, was appointed as Midlands district judge last week after her 17-year legal career.

Speaking to the Metro newspaper, Raffia Arshad said, “I know this is not about me, thise is definitely an issue that surpasses me. It is important for all women, not just Muslim women. But it has a special importance for Muslim women. ”

'I had anxiety that I would be excluded', Arshad said in an interview that she was worried about being excluded from her job as a young girl because of her growing up in a family of working class and her ethnic minority background.

The newly appointed judge said she wanted to use her position "to ensure that the voice of diversity is heard loud and clear".

Stating that the positive responses she received the most valuable part of her appointment, Arshad explained this situation as follows:

“I have received many emails from many men and women. The e-mails of the women who said they were wearing a headscarf and thought that they could not even be a lawyer, were noteworthy. ”

Arshad completed her internship education in London and started her career in 2002. Mary joined the Family Litigation Division.

Throughout her career, she looked at various areas such as private law, forced marriage, female circumcision, as well as cases regarding Islamic law issues.

However, despite her extensive experience, Arshad said that she still faces prejudice and discrimination. The judge stated that a client or interpreter was sometimes thought to be in the courtroom, as in a recent confusion of a bailiff.

Biased view still exists
I have no problem with the bailiff doing this, but this shows that this is still a prejudiced view that as a society, even for someone working in the courts, senior professionals do not look like me.

I think one of the factors that cause women to hold themselves back is Imposter Syndrome. "Am I good enough?" Suddenly, while in the courtroom thise was a lot I thought.

Arshad said that the Law of Scholarship interview of the Inns of Court in 2001 (the bar-like attorney professional organization -ed.n. in UK), where one of her family members told him not to go with a headscarf on the grounds that it would seriously affect her chances.

It is very important for me to accept people as they are. It would also be something I did not want to have to be a different person to continue my profession. For these reasons, I decided to wear my headscarf.
Arshad, who has accomplished a successful career as a lawyer, also wrote a leading publication on Islamic family law.

St. Co-chairs of the Mary Family Litigation Department praised Arshad's efforts to increase professional diversity and inspire minorities.

"Raffia has paved the way for success for Muslim women in law and the Bar Association, she worked without knowing what is fatigue to promote equality and diversity in this profession," said Vickie Hodges and Judy Claxton.

“There was a highly deserved and merit-based assignment. St. As Mary, we are proud of him and wish him every success. ”

Arshad emphasized that the judicial authority has done its utmost to encourage participation, and that it has a personal sense of responsibility to support inter-professional diversity.

https://londragazete.com/ingiltere/...KQaNR7u9aWH0HB_y4EwSD_QGKt3UMJvHHql3P_AgDMEwY
 
First time in England, a judge with a headscarf
For the first time in England, a judge with a headscarf was appointed. Raffia Arshad, 40, was appointed as Midlands district judge last week after her 17-year legal career.

Speaking to the Metro newspaper, Raffia Arshad said, “I know this is not about me, thise is definitely an issue that surpasses me. It is important for all women, not just Muslim women. But it has a special importance for Muslim women. ”

'I had anxiety that I would be excluded', Arshad said in an interview that she was worried about being excluded from her job as a young girl because of her growing up in a family of working class and her ethnic minority background.

The newly appointed judge said she wanted to use her position "to ensure that the voice of diversity is heard loud and clear".

Stating that the positive responses she received the most valuable part of her appointment, Arshad explained this situation as follows:

“I have received many emails from many men and women. The e-mails of the women who said they were wearing a headscarf and thought that they could not even be a lawyer, were noteworthy. ”

Arshad completed her internship education in London and started her career in 2002. Mary joined the Family Litigation Division.

Throughout her career, she looked at various areas such as private law, forced marriage, female circumcision, as well as cases regarding Islamic law issues.

However, despite her extensive experience, Arshad said that she still faces prejudice and discrimination. The judge stated that a client or interpreter was sometimes thought to be in the courtroom, as in a recent confusion of a bailiff.

Biased view still exists
I have no problem with the bailiff doing this, but this shows that this is still a prejudiced view that as a society, even for someone working in the courts, senior professionals do not look like me.

I think one of the factors that cause women to hold themselves back is Imposter Syndrome. "Am I good enough?" Suddenly, while in the courtroom thise was a lot I thought.

Arshad said that the Law of Scholarship interview of the Inns of Court in 2001 (the bar-like attorney professional organization -ed.n. in UK), where one of her family members told him not to go with a headscarf on the grounds that it would seriously affect her chances.

It is very important for me to accept people as they are. It would also be something I did not want to have to be a different person to continue my profession. For these reasons, I decided to wear my headscarf.
Arshad, who has accomplished a successful career as a lawyer, also wrote a leading publication on Islamic family law.

St. Co-chairs of the Mary Family Litigation Department praised Arshad's efforts to increase professional diversity and inspire minorities.

"Raffia has paved the way for success for Muslim women in law and the Bar Association, she worked without knowing what is fatigue to promote equality and diversity in this profession," said Vickie Hodges and Judy Claxton.

“There was a highly deserved and merit-based assignment. St. As Mary, we are proud of him and wish him every success. ”

Arshad emphasized that the judicial authority has done its utmost to encourage participation, and that it has a personal sense of responsibility to support inter-professional diversity.

https://londragazete.com/ingiltere/...KQaNR7u9aWH0HB_y4EwSD_QGKt3UMJvHHql3P_AgDMEwY


I am all for diversity and always have been despite the prejudice often faced during my time in Brixton. But i see this as more being a political statement rather than anything else. I would be asked to remove my hat in a court of law.
 

Camden

Member
Top Poster Of Month
First time in England, a judge with a headscarf
The headscarf is a non issue, non story imho we have for over 17 years had Turbaned judges covering their heads with turbans instead of wigs being Sikhs etc.... Its her ability and knowledge of the law to judge which is important.
 
First time in England, a judge with a headscarf
But Judges are not bare headed, they wear wigs as far as I know.

:croc:

Not in all cases. In criminal cases yes but less so in family or civil proceedings. Her head cover is not being worn for religious reasons . She makes that clear. Not important though to carry it on lol.
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
First time in England, a judge with a headscarf
Let's hope she does not have the word 'suspended' in her vocabulary, some of these crims are taking the p1$$ and getting away with it.
 
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