Jaycey

African Refugee
Environmental concerns
ukraineBusinessNews.jpg

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🔵 Ukraine plans to become a major producer of lithium batteries for Europe’s electric cars, Prime Minister Shmygal told reporters yesterday, reviewing talks he had in Brussels last month. By 2030, Europe will need 18 times more lithium than now, by 2050, 60 times more, he said. “Ukraine has the largest lithium deposits on the European continent,” he said. “Europe sees Ukraine as a partner, both in production and processing…We are interested in added value, production, processing, and the maximum creation of the finished product. Again, we do not want to be just a supplier of raw materials, as we have before.”

🔵 Coal miners may become lithium miners under a pilot project to start closing two coal mines this year, one in Lviv and the other in Donetsk, the Prime Minister. With German and Polish advice and aid, Ukraine’s “Fair Transformation of Coal Regions” project could involve employing some coal miners to work in new lithium mines, he said.
 

Chasey

Member
Environmental concerns
The new tax even applies to the turkish electric car (TOGG), I will post a link to a recent posting on the subject. there are charging points with are also street lamps, these would be suitable for people who live in flats. The charging point in our local town (Isparta) is outside a shopping mall, so 40 mins charging could be easily passed. As for the grid not coping, that is true, but here in Turkey a few incentives for build your own systems would soon sort that out. factory rooves are ideal for PV, in our case we have onlt covered half of our garage and have at least 5 other spaces, but refuse to fork out 1500 Euros to apply to sell to government (not to mention 18% KDV payable on equipment).

The charger point at the local shopping mall? How many charger units are there? And how many cars in the mall car park? so how easy will it be to get your car charged when ALL cars are electric?
 

Chasey

Member
Environmental concerns
View attachment 21246

Ukrainian team develops first-ever electric, amphibious armored vehicle...

View attachment 21245



At last a car properly designed to drive in Turkish towns and cities and deal with Turkish drivers

No ones carving you up if you have a 15mm battling cannon mounted on your roof :D

You know you want one :D
 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Environmental concerns
The charger point at the local shopping mall? How many charger units are there? And how many cars in the mall car park? so how easy will it be to get your car charged when ALL cars are electric?
In my vision petrol stations will become charging points, charge time will decrease, many people will charge at home. Let's be honest, the average daily drive in the UK is 43 miles. You can also spread out the times that people charde their EVs by offering more expensive rates at peak times, cheaper mid week middle of the day to encourage retired people to take advantage of this.
 

Kanga

Member
Environmental concerns
There's a plan to get local councils to cut channels across the pavements to lay charging cables. Presumably that will include grooving up the sides of high rise flats too?
It would be much easier to make car batteries standard sizes for all cars, just different power, and then you could drive into a power exchange area in a garage and swap your battery, like filling a tank.
 

Tenpin

The Yorkshireman
Environmental concerns
Interesting concept.

Bladeless turbines could bring wind power to your home​


Full Story

'Skybrators' generate clean energy without environmental impact of large windfarms, say green pioneers.

Extract:
The giant windfarms that line hills and coastlines are not the only way to harness the power of the wind, say green energy pioneers who plan to reinvent wind power by foregoing the need for turbine towers, blades – and even wind.

The bladeless turbines stand at 3 metres high, a curve-topped cylinder fixed vertically with an elastic rod. To the untrained eye it appears to waggle back and forth, not unlike a car dashboard toy. In reality, it is designed to oscillate within the wind range and generate electricity from the vibration.
 

Kanga

Member
Environmental concerns
It's reported today that the Americans have developed a new type of plane fuel from food waste that could cut emissions dramatically. If that's the case surely we could use that in cars too, instead of using up scarce resources on batteries.
 

Jaycey

African Refugee
Environmental concerns
It's reported today that the Americans have developed a new type of plane fuel from food waste that could cut emissions dramatically. If that's the case surely we could use that in cars too, instead of using up scarce resources on batteries.
I would have thought that burning any kind of fuel, be it at 30,000 feet or at street level, would increase pollution.

 

IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
Environmental concerns
Whatever you burn you will generate NOx gases, these come from the air being burned at high temperatures.
 

Chasey

Member
Environmental concerns
In my vision petrol stations will become charging points, charge time will decrease, many people will charge at home. Let's be honest, the average daily drive in the UK is 43 miles. You can also spread out the times that people charde their EVs by offering more expensive rates at peak times, cheaper mid week middle of the day to encourage retired people to take advantage of this.
My average daily drive for work is about 250 miles doing 5-6 surveys in different locations across London. This meant id need one of the longer range electric cars. However as said before, my biggest problem is its about 120m from my front door to where my car is parked :(
 

Chasey

Member
Environmental concerns
It's reported today that the Americans have developed a new type of plane fuel from food waste that could cut emissions dramatically. If that's the case surely we could use that in cars too, instead of using up scarce resources on batteries.
don't know why they hadn't done this years ago, We bought a Bioetholine Fuel Saab convertible about 10 years ago.

Sadly the nearest bio fuel filling station was about 40 miles away :(


I ran my Mitsubushi Shogan on 50% biofuel Biodeisel. It ran great. Better than standard diesel

When I got the RAV4 i tried it and nearly trashed the engine :(

T
 

yalimart

The Carnwath Massive
Environmental concerns
My average daily drive for work is about 250 miles doing 5-6 surveys in different locations across London. This meant id need one of the longer range electric cars. However as said before, my biggest problem is its about 120m from my front door to where my car is parked :(
To charge a car with that sort of range would need a non domestic fast charger as they are 70 to 95 Kw capacity, mine will have a range of on paper 295 miles (95 Kw) and we have a 50 Kw charger for free 4 miles away, I might take up reading or knitting whilst I charge
 

Chasey

Member
Environmental concerns
To charge a car with that sort of range would need a non domestic fast charger as they are 70 to 95 Kw capacity, mine will have a range of on paper 295 miles (95 Kw) and we have a 50 Kw charger for free 4 miles away, I might take up reading or knitting whilst I charge


Quite so which is why all this 2025 -2030 all electric nonsense is, well.... Nonsense.

The ridiculous environmental short term emission targets remind me of one of my favorite monti python sketches

 

Camden

Member
Environmental concerns

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Undervalued and unrecognized, Turkish waste pickers at mercy of formal recycling sector

Informal waste pickers carry out 80 percent of the recycling in Turkey, but the lack of legal recognition for their work puts them at the mercy of formal players in the sector. Activists are not hopeful that waste pickers will be integrated into the formal recycling scheme in the near future as long as the sector remains under the patronage of private entrepreneurs and unemployment continues to be a bleeding wound for Turkey.


In Turkey, there are estimated to be as many as 500,000 waste pickers (toplayıcılar): Those making a living via the collection of recyclables off the street and from waste bins. This number is only an estimate as there is no official data kept on them.

Waste pickers are the “invisible heroes” of Turkey’s recycling industry, according to their words, as 80 percent of recyclables in Turkey are collected by this labor.

Despite the crucial role they play in the recycling sector, they are regularly excluded from Turkey’s environmental legislation. As a result, they have become a kind of ‘ghost’ within the formal waste management scheme.

The Ankara-based Street Waste Collectors Association (Sokak Atık Toplayıcıları Derneği) is demanding the creation of a legislation recognizing waste picking as a formal profession. This would ensure that that the rights of waste pickers be recognized and accounted for as legal obligations, rather than largess.

Worth the full read
 
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