Question for you

pat

Member
Covid Quarantine in Turkey
Has anyone experienced state quarantine in Turkey?
Just been told there’s no cost for the hotel quarantine.
Is this true ?
 

enoch

Member
Covid Quarantine in Turkey
Has anyone experienced state quarantine in Turkey?
Just been told there’s no cost for the hotel quarantine.
Is this true ?
If you read Kangas post on the foreign & commonwealth it says quarantine location is down to the local authorities.
 

Camden

Member
Covid Quarantine in Turkey
In may people were quarantined were sent Muğla student dormitory hostel ( free) clean and good review Ministry of Youth and Sports in Kötekli Neighborhood in Menteşe district Muğla


back in may ....

 
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Covid Quarantine in Turkey
Saw this post on Facebook. You may find it helpful. It is from a British lady heading back to Turkey.

Quarantine experience for those travelling to Turkey from the UK via a 3rd Country.

We have been trying to return to our principal home in Turkey since the beginning of January, however due to the Covid variant first found in the UK, all direct flights were cancelled. We rebooked for 30th January, but that was also cancelled after the Turkish Government advised all direct flights from the UK are cancelled until further notice.
At this point we decided to fly via a 3rd Country. This is something we had long discussions about, as we were aware of the need to quarantine at a Government Facility at our point of arrival. Also it was a possibility that the 3rd Country route into Turkey could also be closed at some point, so if we were going to do this, we needed to do it quickly.
We booked our flight with Air France from Heathrow via Paris to Istanbul for Monday 25th January. You are required to provided a negative PCR Fit to Fly certificate which must be taken within 72 hours of your departure, so for us, that was within 72 hours of our flight to Istanbul. You also require this for your Paris flight.
We had our PCR test at Heathrow Express Testing. The cost is £100pp, however if you’re flying from Heathrow, you get a 20% discount. We were told the results would take 24 hours, but we received ours within 12 hours. We did plan for the possibility that it might take 48 hours for the results, by booking a flight beyond this time.
The check in process was seamless. We were required to show our Fit to Fly Certificate, as well as our Residency Permits. (Except under exceptional circumstances, It’s worth noting, you cannot fly to Turkey from the UK unless you are a Citizen or Residency Permit Holder) These are input onto the system to give the Turkish Government notification that you will be arriving.
On arrival at Istanbul Airport, immigration staff were waiting at the top of the Air Bridge with a list of the names of those required to quarantine.
We were taken to see Medical Staff who explained the process & asked us to sign and accept the rules of quarantine. Please note that of the 12 passengers requiring to quarantine, only 3 of us actually agreed to the process. The others were escorted away, as they elected to return to the UK.
This process is mandatory. You cannot bypass it by ignoring the official & going straight to Passport Control, as you will be refused entry.
After clearing Passport Control & collecting our luggage, we were escorted to a Minibus & driven to our accommodation, which is student dormitories.
On arrival, we were each given a pillowcase with Toothpaste, Toothbrush, Soap, Shampoo, Bleach, Towels & new Crock Style Shoes. We were then shown to our rooms, where you must remain during quarantine. You are forbidden from leaving.
Our room has 4 single beds, a row of desks & an en suite shower room. There is central heating, with an abundance of hot water. There is also a fridge and plenty of sockets. It’s fair to say that the accommodation is on a par with youth hostels & it’s well worn and basic. If you’re expecting a lovely hotel, you will be disappointed.
You are provided with Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner, as well as tea service about 6 times per day. You’re also given plenty of bottled water. The food is bland & basic. Think of Turkish School Dinners. Rice, Beans, Chicken Casserole, Soup, Fruit, Continental Style Breakfast and you get the idea.
You are also given a basic takeaway menu (See Photo) So if you find you cannot eat the food supplied, which is free, you can order from this menu via WhatsApp.
There is also a free WiFi service which you must request. You should get access 24 hours after this request.
We had a PCR test on the day of our arrival (Free) You will only be informed of the result of your test if it’s positive & that generally happens the following morning.
As we arrived, we were told that provided we have another negative PCR test on day 9, we will be allowed to leave on day 10.
The whole quarantine service is FREE. You do not pay for anything other than the extras that you order.
If you are planning to do this, we would recommend you bring a kettle (£9 from Asda) cups, teabags, coffee, sugar & snacks with you & don’t forget your adapters! You might want to bring your own towels too, as the ones supplied aren’t great.
We have downloaded tonnes of Movies/TV Series to our iPad and lots of books to our kindles. This will help with the boredom.
The best advice we can give is be prepared, remember it’s only for 10 days & you’re free to get on with your life in your Turkish home after that.
 

Camden

Member
Covid Quarantine in Turkey
When you are trying to help and answer someone's post, pulled up by the spelling police ...Sad

So for the TLF spelling pedants its Muğla don't forget your diacritical mark.
 
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Kanga

Member
Covid Quarantine in Turkey
Unlike most venomous snakes, which tend to bite people who are either handling them or who surprise them, the large Australian mulga snake has also been found to attack people who are asleep.
In a new study that examined 27 cases of people bitten by the mulga snake, researchers found that seven of the victims were asleep when they were bitten, between midnight and 5 a.m.
Such bites were not common — most of the people in the study who were bitten had intentionally made contact with a snake. For instance, one victim was bitten while playing with a snake in the garden, and another was bitten while feeding a pet snake.

But 10 people who were bitten had encountered a mulga snake unintentionally, and the fact that seven of these victims were bitten while sleeping “is noteworthy since it represents 70 percent of identified cases involving bites without intentional contact, and suggests that bites sustained during sleep may be more common than previously reported,” the researchers wrote in their report. [7 Shocking Snake Stories]
The mulga snake is the largest terrestrial venomous snake in Australia. The snake’s bites can be fatal; however, the most recent case of a fatal mulga snakebite was reported more than 40 years ago, the researchers wrote.
The majority of the bites in the study occurred between December and March, when the weather in Australia is warmer, the researchers found. Eighty percent of the victims were male.

Snakes don’t always inject their venom when they bite, but in the study, 21 patients had symptoms of envenomation, which means they were injected with venom. Bite victims in the study showed bleeding, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea.
“The thing that was surprising about this study was there was a higher-than-expected rate of envenomation,” said Dr. Sean Bush, a professor of emergency medicine and a snake venom specialist at East Carolina University, who was not involved in the study. The high envenomation rate may stem from the large size of both the animal and its fangs, Bush said.
The high prevalence of bites inflicted while the people were asleep was also surprising, Bush said, because most snakebites occur when snakes feel threatened and try to defend themselves.
The study authors said it isn’t clear why the snakes bit people who were asleep. They speculated that, in one of the cases, “the snake may have been attracted to the victim’s body heat,” or, in another case, the snake was just initially looking for rodents that might have been attracted by a trash can close to a victim’s home.
The study findings were published online on April 13 in the journal Toxicon.


 

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