Sunny Seasider

Life is so precious
Autumn is upon us.
In fact August has felt like it's started already for us in the UK, many grey miserable wet days, however the point of my post. Each season has its advantages and whilst we tend to think of Autumn as the dark nights drawing, in and a later sunrise, but, for me, I do actually enjoy the feeling of comfort, as the house is cosy and you have time to reflect on the great summer that you've had (if you've been fortunate to get sunshine), lol. Autumn brings some great sights and changes, the different colours that the leaves turn, golden brown, russet reds and vibrant yellows. There's also lots of jobs to keep us busy in our gardens, my hubby has been pruning back this week ready to let the trees rest for the winter months, and flourish again next Spring. Tidying all the furniture away, making sure our wild life is well provided for. We have a huge pyracantha, it covers the whole of the garage wall, this year it's got lots of scarlet berries, the birds love to feed on. So today, as I sat inside for most of it watching the rain and thinking, well this is what's to come, and it will do the ground good, so don't be selfish Lesley.

What are your thoughts about Autumn.
 
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bobthenob

Non Active Member
Autumn is upon us.
My thoughts for Autumm are a time to reap the rewards of one's hard work in the garden.Harvesting those beautiful fruit and veg during the months of nuturing the plants,is like a gift from nature to say thank you for taking care of the animals and insects.

This is also the time when the insects and animals are making their beds for the coming winter and l just love seeing the hedgehog going about it's business scrapping up a few leaves to make a cosy warm bed for him to sleep in peace under the shed.l do help the animals along by making sure their are bundles of hay and dug up ground for the animals to fatten themselves up.

So,what l am saying is.Autumm is the time to help the animals and insects so they can stay next year to help you clear up any pests that can do damage to your plants.
 

Sunny Seasider

Life is so precious
Autumn is upon us.
I have to say my favourite time of year at school was the Harvest Festival when we would all take fruits and vegetables in, my Uncle always had his own allotment and he used to get so much pleasure from us kids taking the stuff to school to help those less fortunate than ourselves.

Our Harry hedgehog (because I've adopted him as mine), has his home behind the shed already, just hope that he's replenished his bedding ready for the winter months, he's quite fat now.
 

icebern09

Fighting "The Beast"
Autumn is upon us.
Lesley, funny you should ask this, I posted on another heading my feelings re the oncoming Autumn. I have to say though after reading your post I dont feel so bad about it because I have to agree with you really, there are good things to look forward to and you have mentioned them.#

Thanks for that.

I am already though thinking of next spring, I have been planting bulbs every where, Hyacinths, Daffs, Crocus et cetera.:77wu:
 

Helenm150

Member
Autumn is upon us.
I have been living in Turkey for two and a half years - and I really miss the seasons in England!
 

Sunny Seasider

Life is so precious
Autumn is upon us.
Lesley, funny you should ask this, I posted on another heading my feelings re the oncoming Autumn. I have to say though after reading your post I dont feel so bad about it because I have to agree with you really, there are good things to look forward to and you have mentioned them.#

Thanks for that.

I am already though thinking of next spring, I have been planting bulbs every where, Hyacinths, Daffs, Crocus et cetera.:77wu:

I've just read your thread, we've got a late September flight booked for 12 days, so some sunshine to look forward to, I hope. Yeah Autumn/Winter is not all doom and gloom, I'm going for lots of new bulbs this week-end, it's a great feeling when you get all that splash of colour in early springtime. When I do my pots, I do the Alan Titchmarsh advice way, and layer them, they do give a great display.
 

pldouglas

Member
Autumn is upon us.
The harvests this year have been fantastic in the south east and al have been gathered in now and the fields are ready to plough again. Soft fruit in particular has had a stonking good year and we have made gallons of blackberry wine and blackberry preserves.
In our own garden the vegetables have done so well that we had to buy an extra freezer to help store the glut for the winter. The only thing that did not do so well was brocolli, I think because it bolted before we could eat it all! I'm just hoping for a few more days of sunshine to finish ripening the butternut squash.
We keep a large area of 'wild garden' to help insects and birds, its an area we don't mow and just plant fruit trees and wild flowers, its roughly cut in the autumn so the badgers and birds use the long cut grass for the nests.
We too are looking foward to the scent of the logburners, crumpets with homemade jam, mulled wine, roast dinners with all our homegrown veg, long cool walks along wild coastlines and damp countryside - and knitting without getting too hot!
We're also looking foward to several trips around other areas of england in our motorhome which is so cosy in winter, we're visiting Norfolk next month and heading for Norwich in particular which has no less than 7 interesting sounding museums plus several National Trust properties to take in on the way, then we will travel back down the east coast back towards home taking in all the fabulous scenery on the way.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Autumn is upon us.
The crisp morning misty air gently touching the distant pastures a far mimics poetry in motion as the misty body sways elegantly over the meadow,like an angelic force guiding you to the gifts of nature for all to enjoy.The beauty of the dancing falling leaves from the tree they came, flaunts their true colors of nature to promote a well being for all who can see what nature is telling us.As the leaves settle on the ground displays an artistic oil painting of a splash of glorious colors.
The quiet and calm woody pastures resembles a love of enchantment waiting to explore.l hear the odd rustle of the leaves and find a fox darted from the undergrowth and across the field,with another rustle of leaves further found a hedgehog nuzzling it’s nose into the dense layer of leaves for it’s bedding and looking for some tasty morsels.

Above me l hear the scream of a bird in flight darting between the branches of the tree’s and with the breeze and nature’s autumn melody in motion with the rustling of the leaves together is a smash hit that is priceless.The fresh breath of Autumn air as it talks to you,is telling us to be together in love and harmony with the wisdom of nature.

This is the best time of year when nature never fails in fulfilling it’s promise with the abundance of aspiring wealth of nature gives us for us to enjoy.The food and environmental scenery is feeding us with a sense of knowledge that only fills us with a true meaning of why we are here on earth.The beating heart of Autumn and the beating heart of human’s are as one together working in harmony in promoting dreams that do come true.
 

gren

Member
Autumn is upon us.
While we're on the Autumn subject, can anyone suggest what could be planted outdoors in a Turkish garden next month (October) to come into bloom next year?

Any bulbs? Trees? Grass? etc.

Bob?
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Autumn is upon us.
While we're on the Autumn subject, can anyone suggest what could be planted outdoors in a Turkish garden next month (October) to come into bloom next year?

Any bulbs? Trees? Grass? etc.

Bob?

This really all depends on where you are in the country.And also what soil you have.
ls it alkiline,acidic.clay,sandy,is it rich with microorganism.
Can you give me a little more info please
 

gren

Member
Autumn is upon us.
Its pretty crap soil undeneath-guess its rocky - a bit sandy.
On coast between Didim and Bodrum.

Not rich but have added lawn compost so is improving.
Most stuff grows OK - bouganvilliers, geraniums, sunflowers, olandear...but i think it pretty rocky underneath the very top soil layer which may affect roots.
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Autumn is upon us.
Its pretty crap soil undeneath-guess its rocky - a bit sandy.
On coast between Didim and Bodrum.

Not rich but have added lawn compost so is improving.
Most stuff grows OK - bouganvilliers, geraniums, sunflowers, olandear...but i think it pretty rocky underneath the very top soil layer which may affect roots.

l suppose what you can do is to bury large pots with good quality soil mixed with a bit of your soil in the pots and then dig a hole to bury the pot so it doesn't show.This method is ideal for bulbs and other perennial plants.l used this method many times when the time for taking them out to store,makes it a whole lot easier.
Daffodils,tulips,hyacinths,snowdrops,anemone,are plants that can be used for containers to be buried in the ground and then lifted out later on.Try it,you will find this is a good way of tranferring your flowering bulbs somewhere else if you wish.

The fruit and flowering trees are to be planted in October if you can with your rocky soil.Most trees can tolerate many different types of soils.But you must always securely stake them when newly planted.This will stop the wind rock that kills the tree.lt takes a good 2 to 3 years for the woody roots to establish itself.

Climbers:like the rose,honeysuckle,jasmine,grapevine,are ideal plants for cover and make good wind breakers.You also need to find a way of securing the plant to stop the wind rock.

All the plants that l have mentioned can be planted in October,which is the best time.Because the rain water will aid the root system to flourish.lt is not a good idea to plant in the summer,because the tap water does have sediments that can utilize the nutrients the plant needs to grow and also the new plant is vulnerable to the dry heat,since the root ball hasn't been given a chance to anchor itself in the ground.
 
Autumn is upon us.
autumn..''season of mists and mellow fruitfulness'' John Keats
That's english/uk autumn

you can keep it..misty rainy chilly, you cant plan a day out because its sure to rain or blow, and then you have freezing winter to look forward to for months on end.

its autumn here in Turkey, Turks start and wrap up in September, and they tell me 'kış geldi Sörli' winter has come Shirley !

İ suppose its how you look at things.
Here there's 4 seasons too ...dört mevsim 1.İlk bahar-.spring 2yaz- summer
3.son bahar autumn 4. kış- winter

At least the sea here will be warm until the end of December and there will be colourful, even though bitter ,oranges ornamenting the trees. ( they're are not much good for anything else) and there will be flowers still..and trees whose leaves change colour and drop making a mess..!
İts just in places like sub Saharan Africa or even Australia where they have two seasons ..rainy or dry.
 
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gren

Member
Autumn is upon us.
l suppose what you can do is to bury large pots with good quality soil mixed with a bit of your soil in the pots and then dig a hole to bury the pot so it doesn't show - ideal for bulbs and other perennial plants. Daffodils,tulips,hyacinths,snowdrops,anemone,are plants that can be used for containers ..
The fruit and flowering trees are to be planted in October if you can with your rocky soil.But you must always securely stake them when newly planted.This will stop the wind rock that kills the tree.
Climbers:like rose,honeysuckle,jasmine,grapevine,are ideal plants for cover and make good wind breakers.You also need to find a way of securing the plant to stop the wind rock.
All the plants that l have mentioned can be planted in October,which is the best time.....


Great info thanks Bob!
I'm OK for trees...its the daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, snowdrops, anemone i want to get going. Are they all bulbs/tubers?
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Autumn is upon us.
Great info thanks Bob!
I'm OK for trees...its the daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, snowdrops, anemone i want to get going. Are they all bulbs/tubers?

They are all bulbs.
The large bulbs need to be at least 4 to 5 inches deep.Those are the daffs and the tulips.But before you bung them in the hole.Break up the bottom of the hole add a half inch of sand to the bottom and then lay the bulbs on the sand close together if you want them to flower in bunches and fill in the hole with good quality soil.just water them a little.The winter rains will do the rest for you.[this gives off a far more impressive show].

The smaller bulbs l have always planted them 2 inches deep,same as above,unless you want to spread them out a bit.

lf you use the pot method them it is generally the same,but with the pot covered so you won't be able to see the top rim of the pot.Anemones are almost surface tubers,just bury them an inch deep,water them in and them alone,nature will do the rest.
easy..that's about it
 

gren

Member
Autumn is upon us.
Thanks for the info about the tubers Bob.
Can they be bought anywhere (like Koştaş or a nursery) right now?

And what about the climbers?
Does one have to buy a plant already growing and plant that out now?
:roundgrin
 

bobthenob

Non Active Member
Autumn is upon us.
Thanks for the info about the tubers Bob.
Can they be bought anywhere (like Koştaş or a nursery) right now?

And what about the climbers?
Does one have to buy a plant already growing and plant that out now?
:roundgrin

l have never bought bulbs before in Turkey.They must sell them because many varieties actucally do originate from the med and you do see them in the lstanbul parks full of tulips and daffs.

For the climbers.l usually take cuttings,because it doesn't cost me a penny this way[l can be a tight fisted git sometimes,but l have a belief that nature should always stay free to all]There are two methods in growing from a cutting,that is layering,and air layering which are far more successful then the cutting from a stem and then plonk it in the ground and hope for the best.

lf you wish to buy the plant as whole from a nusery,then dig the hole to a depth where the whole root ball will be fully covered with soil,never exspose the top root ball to the weather elements,because this can cause wilting and other form of diseases and distortion.

1/Dig a hole to the right depth
2/Break up the soil with a trowel at the bottom of the hole
3/Feed the bottom with good humus or compost mixed with a bit of sand[l also add a little phostrogen to the bottom,not to much]
4/tap the root ball a little to spread the roots out a bit
5/Bung the root ball in the hole with the roots slightly spread outwards
6/Add a little bit of soil around the root ball and slightly tamp it down with heel of the shoe or other implements[not to much]
7/Next is to add a good solid wooden stake,by banging it in the hole without damaging the roots
8/Fill in the hole with the remaining soil,until the whole root ball is completely covered[very important]
9/Make a circle of ridged soil around the plant.This allows the water not to escape when watering the plant.
10/Tie the plant loosely to the wooden stake with nylon or anything that will not cut in the plant[never use wires]
11/As the plant starts to grow.Concentrate on three main growing stems and get rid of the rest.This will encourage stronger growth and more energy will be fed into the three stems.You will find as years go on how so beneficial this will be for you,because it is a lot easier to prune and also it encourages more flowers and fruit.
12/When the plant matures tie it losely to fencing[on no account must you intertwine between the rails.Very big mistake]
That's about it...l think
9/
 

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