IbrahimAbi

Grey wisdom
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Very useful but it does not state what 'returning to the UK on a settled basis' consists of.Thanks for posting,
 

TNT123

To Young to be This Old
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
It reads to me Pensioners living in Turkey are no longer covered by NHS and will have to pay if they go back to the UK.
Trev.
 

juco

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Citizens who return to the UK on a settled basis will be classed as ordinarily resident

"Living lawfully in the United Kingdom voluntarily and for settled purposes as part of the regular order of their life for the time being, whether they have an identifiable purpose for their residence here and whether that purpose has a sufficient degree of continuity to be properly described as “settled”."
 

Shen60

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
I'm thinking that if you remain an ordinary resident, that is you still have your main home there and pay council tax and remain registered with a GP, then you are still entirled to free NHS. Unless I have misunderstood.
 

Akasya

Postless Pointer
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Lie , return , state that you are domiciled with a relative , friend or whatever and insist to the GP that you are back for good.

State that you are living an unsettled lifestyle and doss where you can.

They must treat you alongside the travelers from wherever.

Steve
 

bickern

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
New rules to improve overseas visitors

Make of it what you will.
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Changes to NHS charging regulations will also affect former UK residents.
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Overseas visitors who need healthcare while in England will soon be charged differently for using the NHS as part of efforts to recoup £500 million a year by 2017 to 2018.

From April, the way the NHS charges these visitors is being changed so that it does not lose out on income from migrants, visitors and former residents of the UK who have left, who should all pay for their care while in the country.

Within the UK, free NHS treatment is provided on the basis of someone being ‘ordinarily resident’. It is not dependent upon nationality, payment of UK taxes, national insurance contributions, being registered with a GP, having an NHS number or owning property in the UK.

The changes which come into effect from April will affect visitors and former UK residents differently, depending on where they now live.

Treatment in A&E departments and at GP surgeries will remain free for all.

People living in an EEA country or Switzerland.
As is the case already, most people, who live or work in another EEA country or Switzerland will continue to get free NHS care using a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) issued by the country they live in. This means the NHS can reclaim healthcare costs from the original country of residence.

UK state pensioners who live elsewhere in the EEA will now have the same rights to NHS care as people who live in England. This applies to all pensioners who receive a UK state retirement pension and registered for healthcare in Europe with an S1 form.

However, people who live elsewhere in the EEA or Switzerland who are not working and are under the UK retirement age should either use their EHIC if they’re entitled to one, or make sure they have health insurance if they need NHS care when visiting England. Otherwise they will have to pay for their care. This includes former UK residents, and ensures that people who already live and work in the UK do not end up paying through their taxes for visitors who are not economically active.

People living outside the EEA
People who live outside the EEA, including former UK residents, should now make sure they are covered by personal health insurance, unless an exemption applies to them. Anyone who does not have insurance will be charged at 150% of the NHS national tariff for any care they receive.

Exemptions
There are several groups of people who are exempt from charging, or entitled to free care because they remain ordinarily resident here despite spending time outside the UK. UK Crown servants, British Council or Commonwealth War Graves staff, those working in UK government-funded posts overseas, and the spouse/civil partner and children under 18 of these people, are exempt from charging if they were ordinarily resident prior to leaving the UK for that purpose. Those who were not ordinarily resident in the UK before taking up such a post will be charged.

There is also no change for armed forces members, war pensioners and armed forces compensation scheme recipients and their families, who are not required to have formerly been an ordinary resident of the UK.

Returning to the UK to settle
Citizens who return to the UK on a settled basis will be classed as ordinarily resident, and will be eligible for free NHS care immediately.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-rules-to-improve-overseas-visitors-contributions-to-nhs-care
 

immac

Senior Member Has-Been
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Or accept that you actually do live in Turkey and arent a UK resident anymore, stay in Turkey, see a surgeon the same day, have an operation the day after and dont get put on an indefinite waiting list in the UK where hopefully you dont die waiting.

If I have to pay it certainly will not be the NHS that I go to for treatment.

Ian
 

evo80

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
I always thought that if you are living out of the UK for more than 6 months then you were not entitled to NHS care on return. ?
 

Akasya

Postless Pointer
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Only if you declare permanent or traveler status ( unsettled but in UK full time ) can you guarantee free treatment.

Also entering the Uk from an EEC country is a great help. They cannot prove that you were not domiciled in that country.

Steve.
 
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
For the misguided the NHS is not free and never has been. It is still the best health service in the world,admittedly bogged down by immigrants who have contributed nothing into the system. The system was designed to be paid for over a persons working life but is continually abused. No matter where you travel in the world if you are wealthy enough you will always get good health care, so never compare private health care with that of the common man, just think yourselves very lucky.
 
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Would that "abuse" include people who are using relatives addresses in the UK as their "place of residence" but living in Turkey fulltime and returning to use the NHS for pre arranged operations as opposed to emergencies?
If so, I take it their argument of having paid into it for many years gives them the "right" to abuse the system - even though the UK Government says otherwise.
Maybe the NHS of the "common man" would be improved if those who had decided the UK was no longer for them were not cheating the system at the same time as criticising other nationalities for doing just that.
 

ted j

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Not really to do with the NHS, but I intend keeping a UK address (our daughter's place), purely because I can't be sure any correspondence posted to me in Turkey would ever arrive
I will instruct HMRC , my private pensions and nationwide that I am living abroad, but they MUST use the UK address for all correspondence
(To date they have said this will be fine)
 

suzyq

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Also entering the Uk from an EEC country is a great help. They cannot prove that you were not domiciled in that country.

Steve.

Surely they could prove it by asking to see your passport?
 

tosmur

Member
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
It seems unfair to charge people who have lived and paid into the NHS all their lives who later retire abroad to then have to pay for the NHS as a private patient. Especially when some people never work and so never pay anything into the system but get everything free. The NHS is free for people who never work other than that its not free.

I have paid large amounts in taxes etc if I did decide to retire abroad when I reach pensionable age it would seem unfair to charge me for NHS services that I have already paid for again. I feel sorry for people in this position

Maybe expats are easy targets.
 

tykatem

Available in sarcastic to
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
For the misguided the NHS is not free and never has been.

Care to qualify that statement?

With the exception of some charges, such as prescriptions and optical and dental services, the NHS in England remains free at the point of use for anyone who is a UK resident.

About the National Health Service (NHS) in England - NHS Choices

And before the usual suspects go on about how they've paid their NI contributions and taxes for eons, it matters not. Even if you've never paid any taxes whatsoever, you're still entitled to use the NHS for free, so long as you're classed as a UK resident.

You should know that your NI payments (dependant upon which Class you pay) count towards benefits such as your basic state pension, contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, contribution-based employment and support allowance, maternity allowance and bereavement benefits.
Remember, you only pay National Insurance contributions if you earn above £153 a week.

https://www.gov.uk/national-insurance/overview


Pete
 
Last edited:
A Little Clarity on Who Pays for NHS Services
Not really to do with the NHS, but I intend keeping a UK address (our daughter's place), purely because I can't be sure any correspondence posted to me in Turkey would ever arrive
I will instruct HMRC , my private pensions and nationwide that I am living abroad, but they MUST use the UK address for all correspondence
(To date they have said this will be fine)
Of course many UK agencies ask for that when you have retired abroad. Sadly some people want to leave the UK permanently but carry on using services to which they are no longer entitled - such as the NHS - which as tykatem points out has nothing to do with how many years you have paid in.
Yes, it may seem unfair. I too have paid in all my life prior to leaving Britain. However sometimes life just sucks and you make a decision and cant have it both ways...unless like some you abuse the system, and then go on to moan about immigrants abusing it.The fact that you have paid into it and they havent is immaterial.
 

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